Text Size: A  A  A

Chesapeake Bay News

Oct
30
2012

Tributary Tuesday: Lost River (Hardy County, W.Va.)

True to its name, West Virginia’s “Lost River” disappears.

Lost River begins in West Virginia’s eastern panhandle. But just a few miles downstream, it flows into a series of caves and is carried underground. Known locally as “the Sinks,” these caves shelter the river until it reaches Wardensville, where it emerges under a different name: the Cacapon.

Trees and valleys hover over Lost River in the fall.

Image courtesy Mark Plummer/Flickr

Looking for Lost River? Catch a glimpse in the 3,700-acre Lost River State Park. And if the weather is hiker-friendly, take a trip up to Cranny Crow Overlook, where, at 3,200 feet high, you will be able to see five counties in two states. The park also offers opportunities for horseback riding and swimming.

A view from Cranny Crook Overlook near Lost River.

Image courtesy vitia/Flickr

Explore the nearby Trout Pond Recreation Area to enjoy the only natural lake in West Virginia, created by a sinkhole that filled with water from a mountain stream. Trout Pond and the neighboring Rockcliff Lake boast sandy mountainside beaches, optimal fishing and challenging hiking trails.

More from Lost River:

  • For local flavor, visit the Lost River Artisan's Cooperative, a museum that houses work from regional artists and Civil War-era artifacts found on the grounds.
  • Consider planning your trip around the annual Heritage Weekend in Hardy County, W.Va., a celebration of quilting crafts, local architecture and fiddle, banjo and mandolin music.
  • Nearby, the George Washington and Jefferson National Forests provide a stretch of “real wilderness” from one end of Virginia to the other, crossing into parts of West Virginia and Kentucky.
author
About Caitlin Finnerty - Caitlin Finnerty is the Communications Staffer at the Chesapeake Research Consortium and Chesapeake Bay Program. Caitlin grew up digging for dinosaur bones and making mud pies in Harrisburg, Pa. Her fine arts degree landed her environmental field work jobs everywhere from Oregon to Maryland. Now settled in Baltimore, she is eagerly expecting her first child while creating an urban garden oasis on her cement patio.


Categories

Archives

410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved