Text Size: A  A  A

Bay Journal

Bay Journal is published by Chesapeake Media Service to inform the public about issues and events that affect the Chesapeake Bay. With a print circulation of 50,000, the Bay Journal is published monthly except for midsummer and midwinter and is distributed free of charge. To be added to the mailing list, fill out the online subscription form. Bundles of the Bay Journal are also available for distribution.

Below are some recent stories from Bay Journal.

Latest Issue

Despite higher score, Baltimore waterways still get failing grade

Baltimore’s harbor and the streams that feed into it again merited a failing grade on their 2013 annual report card, indicating the waters around the metro area suffer from continued loads of nitrogen, phosphorus, sediment and garbage. The report card, which is part of the Healthy Harbor…

Bay had smallest ‘dead zone’ on record for early July

Hurricane Arthur may have produced a rainy 4th of July for beachgoers, but its winds brought some good news for Chesapeake Bay water quality. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reported that the oxygen-starved dead zone observed in early July was the smallest for that period seen in…

Urban Waters grants going to Anacostia, Patapsco watersheds

Three projects benefitting the Anacostia Watershed in the District of Columbia and Maryland will benefit from $1.2 million in EPA grants to revitalize urban waterways. A project in Baltimore that benefits the Patapsco Watershed also will benefit from this round of urban-focused grants. In the…

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

Once called the Chesapeake Bay ducking dog, today’s Chesapeake Bay retriever has expanded its reputation and is noted for its intelligence and skills in field trials, hunt tests, conformation, obedience, agility and tracking, as well as being a protective family pet. How much do you know…

Setting the Record Straight on Waters of the US

There’s been some confusion about EPA’s proposed “Waters of the U.S.” rule under the Clean Water Act, especially in the agriculture community, and we want to make sure you know the facts. We know that we haven’t had the best relationship with the agriculture…

Map: Chesapeake Bay manure use vs. the rest of the country

Compared to the rest of the nation, the Chesapeake Bay region is a heavy user of manure as fertilizer. That’s largely because of the Delmarva Peninsula’s large chicken industry, and because animal agriculture is a staple of both Pennsylvania and Virginia. Because of the mix of animal…

Map: Chesapeake Bay chicken legacy intact

This map shows that a key part of the Chesapeake Bay’s agricultural legacy remains intact: chicken broilers on the Delmarva Peninsula. The map shows one dot for every 2 million broiler chickens in the country left the middle and western parts of the country almost entirely blank and showed…

Census: Farmland growing in Bay states

After decades of decline, one resource in the Bay watershed is making a comeback — farmland. Figures from the most recent agricultural census from the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that the Bay watershed gained about 125,000 acres of agricultural land between 2007 and 2012,…

DC’s hatchery seeks to restore shad to Anacostia

On a warm afternoon in early May, a group of biologists from the District of Columbia’s Department of the Environment could be seen leaning over the side of a boat, tipping the contents of a clear bag into the Anacostia River. The bag was filled with tiny shad larvae, freshly spawned and…

The Chesapeake Bay’s pollution diet, and my own

Tomorrow’s Midday on the Bay show is going to be a little bit different. I’m going to be getting personal with the thousands of people who listen every month. I’ll be talking about how I lost 40 pounds. Twice. What does that have to do with the Chesapeake Bay? For decades, we…

Halfway house for hikers

The Appalachian Trail was conceived in the 1920s as a getaway that would allow East Coast city dwellers to flee to the trail, and trailside communities, to recover from their stressed lives. Nearly a century later, it appears that’s needed more than ever. Between 2 million to 3 million…

War of 1812’s ghost battlefields

Everyone lives on the landscape, in one form or another. Some pause long enough to look at it; a few spend their lives looking deeply through its surface to see what others miss. Ed Seufert is in the last category. I met Ed during my latest wanderings on the Star-Spangled Banner National…

From urban eyesore to awesome escape

The driver of our pontoon boat cut the motor as we ducked into a marsh branching off the Anacostia River. Here, the murmur of the city gave way to chirping birds and the greening landscape of Kenilworth Marsh, the only freshwater tidal wetland on the river that has remained largely intact over…

Slow steam ahead

Drive up to Schnaitman’s Boat Rentals in Wye Mills, MD, and it’s as if you stepped back in time. Even on a windy day, the Wye River is calm. Couples from New Jersey and Pennsylvania idle away the day in skiffs and rowboats, crab traps and lines overboard, hoping to catch some dinner.…

Swell shells

If you pull a fan-shaped shell from a stream in southeastern Virginia this summer — especially if that stream lies east of Interstate 95 — pay attention. You may have found the trace of an ocean ecosystem that covered the Virginia coastal plain 4.5 million years ago. Officially…

Fones Cliff-hanger

Capt. John Smith may, or may not have been the first “tourist” to see Fones Cliffs on the Rappahannock River; there were Spaniards in the Chesapeake before him. But he was the first that we know of who wrote about them. On Aug. 19, 1608, Smith and a dozen crewmen sailed up the river…

Not enough done to curb phosphorus in water, reports say

Pollution from agriculture — particularly phosphorus from chicken manure — continues to choke several Eastern Shore rivers, and regulators are not doing enough to monitor concentrations coming from farms, according to two new reports released Monday. The reports are called…

Rappahannock River Valley

Visitors to the Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge may experience this linear refuge in any number of ways, depending upon who — or what — they are. For some, the refuge represents outdoors recreation opportunities for all ages and all abilities provided by the access…

She’s a mother hen when it comes to defending chicken rights

Washington, D.C.—The young mother passing the White House stopped to read the arresting big posters spread along the grassy edge of adjacent Lafayette Park. “Be glad you’re not a chicken,” she said to her child. It was a perfect, mid-Atlantic spring day, trees freshly…

Getting a handle on slippery eel’s population can help Bay’s

When you hear the word “eel,” what comes to mind? For many, eels are repulsive, slimy creatures to be avoided. But to fishermen and crabbers, eels are an important commodity, either as bait or exported as a delicacy. Whatever you may think of them, eels are extraordinary fish,…

VA groups influence gas decisions through education, cooperation

While the country enjoys relatively stable energy prices, largely because of the increase in natural gas development, residents in parts of Virginia remain unsure how their communities will contribute to the supply. But conservation, land trust and citizen groups are taking lessons learned from…

Leases pit Maryland watermen against oyster growers

Maryland’s commercial clammers and its aquaculture industry are at odds over how to share the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, a clash that is pitting waterman against waterman in some cases and an old way of life against a new one. At issue are two, 5-acre plots of bottom — one in the…

D.C. government to study toxic sediment in Anacostia River, determine cleanup plan

The District of Columbia has begun a four-year process that will determine how to best deal with toxic contamination in the Anacostia River — a step that is a “significant, albeit preliminary, milestone” in the ongoing effort to clean up the urban waterway, supporters of the…

A girl, a question, and a long answer

Every day, I learn something new from my children. The latest lesson is that they often think in absolutes. At least, that is the case for my soon-to-be 9-year-old. There is right, and there is wrong. This is how you spell a word. This is how you make the number 5. This is how you multiply. This…

Explore Harriet Tubman Country

Land is not only more complex than we know. It is more complex than we can know but endless fun in the trying. Explore just a single patch of farm field and woods on different days, in different seasons, with a birdwatcher, a developer, a historian or a soils scientist, a farmer, a child, a…

Three new reports talk trash

Three important news items related to trash hit the wires last week. Now trash may not be the most exciting subject — nor is it likely to attract a lot of attention around a long holiday weekend. But solid waste that becomes trash in our waterways through mishandling or outright littering…

Flashy American redstart holds it own in avian beauty contest

Our car rumbled slowly over the boardwalk bridge. As we entered the woods, the boards gave way to an earthen road surface. The hybrid’s electric engine edged us silently into the sun-dappled forest, which was alive with bird songs and calls. Almost immediately, we spied an energetic, tiny…

Larger-than-average dead zone predicted for Bay this summer

A slightly larger-than-average dead zone is predicted for the Chesapeake Bay during the early portion of this summer, scientists say. The prediction, which means fish and shellfish will find substantial portions of the Bay off-limits because it has too little oxygen, is driven largely by a…

New Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement is more pragmatic than its predecessors

The Chesapeake Bay restoration effort gained new partners — and new goals — as leaders approved a multi-state agreement that they insist will hold them, and their successors, more accountable in producing real results. After nearly a year-and-a-half of negotiations, the Chesapeake…

Home Depot to limit pesticides on plants by year’s end

There’s a lot of buzz about bees right now. From the president to a handful of national retailers, new programs are exploring how to better protect these key pollinators for not only your flowerbed but also for about every third bite of food we eat each day. And what’s good for bees…

410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved