Text Size: A  A  A

Bay Journal

Bay Journal is published by Chesapeake Media Service to inform the public about issues and events that affect the Chesapeake Bay. With a print circulation of 50,000, the Bay Journal is published monthly except for midsummer and midwinter and is distributed free of charge. To be added to the mailing list, fill out the online subscription form. Bundles of the Bay Journal are also available for distribution.

Below are some recent stories from Bay Journal.

Latest Issue

Alliance’s RiverSmart Homes connects private-public-civil sectors

Building relationships among the public, private and civil society sectors has proven to be a successful model for the management of water resources around the globe. The RiverSmart Homes Program in the District of Columbia is a local example of this cooperative model. Funded by the District…

Tips for keeping invasive plants at bay

Invasive non-native bushes, vines and other plants are here to stay, it seems, but residents of the Bay watershed can save their yards and even some parks, invasive plant experts agree. They offer these tips:   1)  Know what’s growing in your yard. “The most important…

As foreign plants spread, you can’t see the forest for the weeds

Foreigners are taking over the Chesapeake Bay region, but not the ones some politicians are talking about this election season. Largely unnoticed and even abetted by unwitting residents, legions of plants from Asia, Europe and other parts of the world are spreading across the 64,000-square-mile…

Oyster festival in St. Mary’s County, MD, draws fans from across US

The first time that George Hastings entered the U.S. National Oyster Shucking Contest in St. Mary’s County, MD, he didn’t win. But his bright blue eyes were set on the prize. “I knew right then I’d be clearing my schedule every third weekend in October and going to St.…

How clean is clean enough on the Anacostia?

How clean is clean enough? That's the question raised recently over the effort to rid the Anacostia River of the mountains of trash littering its banks and waters. The Natural Resources Defense Council argues in a lawsuit filed last week that the trash "pollution diet" on which the…

Spawning shad set records: high in Potomac, lows in VA

This spring was another season of ups and downs for the Chesapeake’s troubled American shad as recent monitoring and stocking reports show that restoration of the once-abundant migratory fish to Bay tributaries remains an elusive goal. Spawning shad surged to another record high in the…

Study finds blue catfish don’t seem to target shad and herring, but flatheads may

The scientific name of American shad, Alosa sapidissima, may mean savory fish, but it appears that the region’s hungry horde of blue catfish don’t necessarily share that view. Some fishery managers in recent years have worried that rapidly growing numbers of the nonnative catfish in…

PA fish official battles other agencies over status of Susquehanna

During his 36 years with the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, John Arway has repeatedly faced off against those he sees threatening the state’s waterways. Once, he said, a coal miner attacked him across a boardroom table. Another time, a gas driller tried to run over him with a…

Oyster reefs flourish in the shadows of military, pollution

The oysters came up in the dredge like I hadn’t seen them in 50 years (and rarely even back then): huge and clumped together and bedecked with sponges and all manner of marine organisms, including younger oysters, thriving in the niches of the natural reef we’d just busted into. It…

Float through history on York River’s Taskinas Creek

A small flotilla of canoes filled with “junior rangers” and their parents was floating on the gentle, outgoing tide of Virginia’s Taskinas Creek.  The current pulled the canoes past muddy banks, pockmarked by the holes of fiddler crabs and gripped by the roots of small…

2015 Bay water quality was fourth best since 1985

Dry conditions over much of the Bay watershed helped to make 2015 the fourth-best year for overall Bay water quality in three decades, according to figures released Wednesday by the Chesapeake Bay Program. Monitoring data from the state-federal partnership showed that 37 percent of the Bay and…

UMCES president Boesch to step down

Donald F. Boesch, who has been at the helm of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science for 27 years, announced Tuesday that he will be stepping down as president next year. Boesch, who has had the second longest tenure as a leader at one of the University System of…

Hogan moves to lift rule for less-polluting septic systems in MD

The Hogan administration is rolling back a 4-year-old regulation that required less-polluting but costlier septic systems for all new homes in Maryland that aren’t connected to sewers. The move seems sure to please builders, rural politicians and their constituents, but critics say…

Fixing Kent Island’s failing septics - at a price

When the Bay Bridge opened in 1952, developers raced across to the Eastern Shore to build dreams. Real estate agents sold vacation homes, family getaways, retirement retreats and quaint cottages so close to the water it was practically in their backyards. On Kent Island, Maryland’s oldest…

Use of porous pavement catching on despite high price, maintenance

Imagine driving into a parking lot on a rainy day and trying to find that spot where you can get out of your car without stepping into a puddle. Happens all the time, right? Not always. A small, but growing number of parking lots remain puddle-free in wet weather because they have porous…

Eastern wood pewee’s beauty is in the ear of the beholder

Pink and white lotuses and yellow water lilies filled the ponds that dot the verdant landscape. The serene landscape had drawn us back to this peaceful spot countless times. The Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens in Washington, DC, always soothe away my troubles and leave me with a profound sense of calm.…

Seafood warehouse zeroing in on eliminating all of its waste

Though compressed to a fraction of their original size, a small stack of foam logs at the ProFish warehouse in he District of Columbia still smelled of their original purpose: foam containers for schlepping seafood. That reek was one of the reasons it took years to find a second home —…

Savage River fishing trip highlights importance of headwaters

Recently my friend, John Neely, who is also a board member of the Chesapeake Conservancy, took me fly fishing on Savage River. Savage River is a headwater tributary of the Potomac River, on the western edge of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Its watershed occupies more than 74,000 acres of mostly…

Boost federal aid to PA farmers, group urges

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation called Tuesday for a major boost in federal funding to help Pennsylvania jump-start its lagging Bay cleanup efforts, arguing that the Keystone State could make significant progress with a targeted push to reduce farm pollution in just five heavily agricultural…

Land, water trek offers insights to lower Susquehanna

It was a picture-perfect morning and I was all set to check out a new bike-and-kayak excursion offered by an outfitter along the Susquehanna River. And then I received a surprise: My son, Noah, decided to come with me. Usually the only opportunity to steal time with my busy 14-year-old is during…

Environmental group gets say in Baltimore sewage fix

A federal judge has given a Baltimore watershed watchdog group a formal say in determining what the city must do to stop polluting its streams and harbor with raw sewage. U.S. District Court Judge J. Frederick Motz on Thursday granted Blue Water Baltimore’s motion to intervene in the…

Late August ‘dead zone’ was near normal

Oxygen conditions in the Chesapeake remained in the average range in late August, after having been whipsawed between being among the best on record in early summer, then worse than normal in late July. In late August, about 0.97 cubic miles contained low oxygen, or hypoxic, water which was…

A Maryland chicken farmer goes organic

When I met Andrew McLean last summer, I was with a group of a dozen journalists on his Ruthsburg chicken farm. We were there as part of a Chesapeake Bay field trip put on by the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources for reporters from all over the world, which I helped plan. At…

Ruling Could Unleash Solar Power Growth in Virginia

A recent Virginia regulatory ruling could make it much easier for homeowners, businesses and other building owners to go solar, potentially boosting the state’s lagging efforts to generate power from the sun. A hearing examiner for the State Corporation Commission, Virginia’s utility…

Stricter safeguards sought for bottom ash at Baltimore power plant

Environmental activists and some local residents are pressing Maryland regulators to impose stricter water-quality safeguards on an aging power plant in the Baltimore area that’s periodically releasing “bottom ash” from its coal-fired boilers into a Chesapeake Bay tributary.…

Without the rain, we’d be all washed up

God bless the summer rainstorms. If you’ve felt annoyed by these deluges, there’s a reason. You’re insane, like most of us. We Americans love a sunny day, a bright blue dome and flat green landscape, though we live mostly indoors and wouldn’t know if a meteor had…

Blue crab a Chesapeake favorite for predators in and out of water

When you hear the words Chesapeake Bay, one creature quickly comes to mind: the famous blue crab. This succulent seafood is the pride and pleasure of the Bay. The scientific name for blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, illustrates its value as a favored delicacy. Callinectes means beautiful swimmer…

Would eating fewer burgers be good for the Bay?

Perhaps you’ve installed a rain barrel and started carpooling to work a few days a week to reduce the amount of pollution you’re contributing to the Chesapeake Bay. But have you considered the amount of meat you eat? According to a new, improved nitrogen calculator released recently…

Tred Avon oyster restoration resumes for the time being

After a seven-month delay, oyster restoration work is back on track — for the moment, at least — in Maryland’s Tred Avon River sanctuary. But the future course of the state’s efforts to revive the Chesapeake Bay’s iconic bivalves remains very much up in the air, as…

Bay scientist Boynton honored for his research, commitment

Thirty years ago, at the dawn of the Chesapeake Bay’s restoration movement, scientists and policy makers alike thought that the largest sources of pollution came from sewage, industrial pipes or even agricultural herbicides. Fix the pipes, they reasoned, and you fix the problem. But a…

410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved