Text Size: A  A  A

Bay Journal

Bay Journal is published by Chesapeake Media Service to inform the public about issues and events that affect the Chesapeake Bay. With a print circulation of 50,000, the Bay Journal is published monthly except for midsummer and midwinter and is distributed free of charge. To be added to the mailing list, fill out the online subscription form. Bundles of the Bay Journal are also available for distribution.

Below are some recent stories from Bay Journal.

Latest Issue

Poplar’s rising popularity

Mark Mendelsohn has fond memories of visiting his grandparents on the West River in Annapolis. The family would pile in a skiff and run out to the banks of Poplar Island in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay. There, his grandmother would catch so many bluefish that her arms would be sore. But the…

At a loss for what to do? Find your Chesapeake

Just in time for this summer, the National Park Service has launched a website, FindYourChesapeake.com, to help people find outdoor adventures both around the corner, and throughout the watershed. The site contains information about more than 350 sites where people can have a Bay-related…

To prevent monarchs from becoming rare, milkweed must stay common

The monarch butterfly is one of the most recognizable species of wildlife in all of North America. Easily identified by dark orange wings with black veins and white edge spots, this 4-inch butterfly is found throughout the United States, southern Canada and Mexico. They undertake one of the…

Pope’s environmental encyclical a validation to some, call to action for others

It was one of those moments when everything came together. On June 18, Pope Francis issued an encyclical — a teaching letter to the global Catholic Church — focused on the environment. As a Catholic who has spent years working professionally and personally to protect our land,…

Nutrient management plans are widespread, but some wonder if they are followed

Each year, farmers managing more than 2.2 million acres of croplands in the Bay watershed pull out plans that guide how they apply animal manure and commercial fertilizer on fields of corn, wheat, hay and other crops. What they do with those plans, and exactly how much their actions reduce the…

CBF sues Virginia for not making livestock stream exclusion mandatory

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation announced legal action against Virginia for failing to protect streams, rivers and the Chesapeake Bay from the pollution that results when livestock are allowed access to waterways. The CBF contends that the Virginia State Water Control Board and the Virginia…

Relaxing, No! But this yoga class rids one woman of a fear

Of the many exercises I do every week, the side plank is my least favorite. It involves taking the already loathsome plank and twisting it, so that you are stacking your hips and supporting your body with just the palm of your hand. If you can attain the pose without shaking, you’re supposed…

In the Wake of Beautiful Swimmers

It’s mid-June on Deal Island, still a couple of hours until dawn when we board the Chesapeake Bay workboat, Lady Ellen, with Grant Corbin and his two mates for a long day of ‘peeler potting’—fishing unbaited crab pots in the waters of Tangier Sound. The pots attract crabs…

Slightly smaller dead zone predicted for Chesapeake Bay

Attention swimmers, especially the beautiful little ones: scientists anticipate a slightly smaller, though still large, dead zone to form in the Chesapeake Bay this summer. By “still large,” they mean it will still rob a large portion of the Bay — the equivalent of 2.3 million…

Speakers open up on population, which is usually left out of conversation

The Chesapeake Bay is troubled by many things. Manure. Sewage. Pesticides. Oil. Litter. Fertilizer. Sediment. But one source lies behind all of them — us. According to experts at a recent conference, the growing number of people in the Chesapeake region has thwarted the Bay restoration for…

What happens upstream, shows up downstream

Once upon a time, in a galaxy not at all far away, “the facilities” were an outhouse 100 feet from the kitchen door. Time and population growth led to septic systems and eventually, to “public” wastewater treatment plants — and under-river pipes carrying products that…

We need to learn how to discuss population growth before talking about it

The agenda seemed straightforward for the final day of the Bay Journal’s winter conference on Growth and the Future of the Chesapeake Bay—talk about how to slow or reverse population increase, a little-discussed but significant part of the Bay’s environmental problems. Yet, by…

Eagle watchers want to restrict fishing near Conowingo Dam

The Conowingo Dam is a hugely popular outdoors destination. Birders flock to the enormous structure that spans the Susquehanna River to watch eagles, herons and a pair of peregrine falcons. Anglers crowd along Fishermen’s Park to cast for walleye and perch. Photographers turn their long…

Clean drinking water unites efforts of watershed groups, suppliers

The health of the Chesapeake Bay and healthy drinking water are as connected as the creeks, streams and rivers that flow through our 64,000-square-mile Bay watershed. What’s good for clean water in our local waterways is good for the Bay — and for our public water supply.…

Seventeen public access sites open along Chesapeake rivers and streams

Getting out on the rivers that feed Chesapeake Bay got easier this past year, as the Chesapeake Bay Program partners opened 17 new access points. They include boat ramps, soft launches for canoes and kayaks, fishing sites and walking trails. Virginia opened the most new sites, 14 sites, while…

Where is everyone?

Last Saturday, I decided to take my daughters hiking. We’ve been doing a lot of hiking lately. The week before, my older daughter and I climbed Sugarloaf Mountain. The week before that, the two of us went for an early-evening hike through Robert E. Lee Park. Because it was nearing 85…

MD oyster farmers form association to protect their interests

Maryland oyster farmers have formed an association to lobby for their interests in Annapolis, ease permitting red tape and educate the public about the benefits of growing bivalves. The Maryland Shellfish Growers Association became incorporated this spring. Virginia has a similar association.…

Baltimore benefits from green grants

The U.S. EPA and the Chesapeake Bay Trust, in cooperation with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, have awarded $727,500 to greening projects - many of them in underserved Baltimore neighborhoods. The money is coming through the Green Streets, Green Towns, Green Jobs grant initiative.…

Ann Jennings named Chesapeake Bay Commission Virginia director

The Chesapeake Bay Commission has announced that Ann F. Jennings will become the Virginia director for the commission. She has been with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Virginia office for 18 years, and has served as CBF’s Virginia Executive Director since 2004. The Chesapeake Bay…

Paddling the Baltimore Harbor: A Gift from the city

Sunday was my birthday, and the city of Baltimore and the Waterfront Partnership gave me a lovely gift:  A beautiful morning of kayaking the flat waters of Baltimore Inner Harbor. They threw in a charming Australian guide, a lovely group of fellow paddlers and temperatures that were stifling…

Top of the world experience

Spruce Knob stands at the western edge of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. But a visitor standing atop the windswept peak would be excused for thinking they were at the edge of a northern wilderness. Even in midsummer, the top of this West Virginia mountain is a refreshingly cool escape from the…

Preserving Mount Vernon’s Potomac

Stand on Mount Vernon’s back porch and look out across the Potomac River. The nearly unbroken sweep of woods and farm fields is very similar to that which George and Martha Washington would have seen any spring day in the 18th century. That this beautiful and historic view is nearly intact…

Father Nature!

Father knows best? In nature, sometimes he does and sometimes he doesn’t. Can you match these fathers with their descriptions? Beaver Black Widow Spider Chipmunk Daddy Long Legs Great Horned Owl Lined Sea Horse Red-Bellied Woodpecker Red Fox 1. This father helps his offspring by…

WV struggling to hold the line on trees, runoff

If there’s one sight visitors to West Virginia expect to see, it’s trees. Tree-covered mountains and tree-lined streams are central to the image of the state — and to the rest of the Chesapeake Bay’s water-quality equation. But the eight-county portion of West Virginia…

EPA review finds Pennsylvania significantly off track to meet Bay goals

Pennsylvania this year needs to double the number of farm acres under nutrient management and plant seven times as many acres of forest and grass buffers as it did last year to help it get back on track to meet Chesapeake Bay nutrient reduction targets, but it lacks programs or policies to achieve…

Maryland’s Governor, two departments, sued for stalling clean air regulation

The Chesapeake Physicians for Social Responsibility and the Sierra Club filed a lawsuit today against Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and two of his departments for blocking a clean-air rule that would have protected the public. The regulation, known as the NOx rule (for nitrogen oxide), would have…

STAR award highlights Baltimore’s green efforts

Baltimore is getting an award tonight for its efforts to build a more sustainable community. The award comes from STAR- Sustainable Tools for Assessing and Rating Communities. It honors the city for adapting for climate change, its work in urban agricultural food production and its commitment to…

Accomack County, VA, to host Amazon Solar Farm US East

Solar energy arrays are slated to become the newest “farming” endeavor on Virginia’s eastern shore, joining multimillion dollar shellfish farming and large-scale poultry farms that characterize the mostly rural county. Amazon Web Services, Inc. announced in a June 10, 2015,…

Tiny insect toppling region’s majestic hemlocks

The grave of John McCaskey rests on a Pennsylvania ridge top, overlooking the hemlocks he fought to protect. In the early 20th century, McCaskey helped save the stand of majestic, old growth trees from harvest. In 1973, it became a National Natural Landmark. But the fight to save these hemlocks…

Man missing, presumed drowned, at Bloede Dam

A 22-year-old Landover man is missing and presumed dead after swimming in the waters near the Bloede Dam Sunday. The man, Byron Diaz, was swimming on a beautiful evening with a group of seven friends in an area posted with “no swimming” signs. The group entered on the Baltimore…

410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved