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Chesapeake Bay News

Jun
08
2016

Humans of the Chesapeake: Bill Anderson

Bill Anderson is an avid fisherman living in Blair County, Pennsylvania, and the nonprofit he leads has restored 28,000 square feet of forest buffer, secured several miles of permanent public access for fishing, and organized annual cleanups along the 32-mile Little Juniata River.

In our interview, we asked Anderson what the Chesapeake Bay means to him. Watch the video above to hear his response.

Learn more about the efforts to restore this wild trout fishery in our Restoration Spotlight.

Throughout Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week, we'll be sharing the stories of people who live, work and play in the Chesapeake region. Join the conversation on social media: #HumansOfTheChesapeake

Video by Will Parson



Jun
07
2016

Humans of the Chesapeake: Colin Christopher

Colin Christopher is the Executive Director of Green Muslims, a Washington, D.C.-based organization with the mission of helping their community live in the environmental spirit of Islam. The organization’s ‘Our Deen is Green’ Youth Outdoor Education Program offers a range of field trips to places like the Chesapeake Bay, local farms and conserved lands to demonstrate real-life examples of how Islam and the environment are entwined.

In our interview, we asked Christopher what the Chesapeake Bay means to him. Watch the video above to hear his response.

Learn more about Green Muslims and the Our Deen is Green program.

Throughout Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week, we'll be sharing the stories of people who live, work and play in the Chesapeake region. Join the conversation on social media: #HumansOfTheChesapeake

Video by Will Parson



Jun
05
2016

Humans of the Chesapeake: Vicki Blazer

Vicki Blazer is a Fish Biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Based in West Virginia, Blazer has studied how intersex characteristics in smallmouth bass and other fish are linked to chemical contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay region.

In our interview, we asked Blazer what the Chesapeake Bay means to her. Watch the video above to hear her response.

Watch how Blazer and her team work in the field in our Bay 101: Intersex Fish video.

Vicki Blazer of the United States Geological Survey leads a field survey of smallmouth bass from the Shenandoah River in Front Royal, Va., on Sept. 29, 2014.

Throughout Chesapeake Bay Awareness Week, we'll be sharing the stories of people who live, work and play in the Chesapeake region. Join the conversation on social media: #HumansOfTheChesapeake

Video and photo by Will Parson



Jun
03
2016

Photo of the Week: Use caution at turtle crossings

Two eastern box turtles cross Croom Airport Road in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. From spring through fall, you can often see turtles like these crossing the road to find a mate, build a nest or track down food or water. But each year, many of these slow-moving reptiles are injured or killed after being struck by vehicles. With their rudimentary ears, turtles have a hard time hearing oncoming cars and can’t move quickly enough to get out of the way. In fact, although both male and female turtles can be found crossing roadways, research has shown that many aquatic turtle populations in the United States have unusually high proportions of males, in part because so many females are hit by vehicles while trying to find good nesting territory.

What can you do to help? If you happen upon a turtle as it makes its way across the road, follow these guidelines to safely help it on its journey:

  • First, make sure to keep yourself, others and the turtle safe by being aware of other drivers and your surroundings.
  • Second, limit your contact with the critter. If there’s no oncoming traffic, observe the turtle at a safe distance while allowing it to continue across the road on its own. If you must pick a turtle up, be gentle and avoid handling it too much. Using both hands, lightly grasp the shell near its middle, and keep the critter close to the ground in case it falls. And remember, never pick a turtle up by its tail.
  • Finally, always keep the turtle moving in the same direction it was already heading—don’t turn it around. Move it quickly across the roadway in as direct a line as possible. If you shift the turtle in a different direction, it will simply attempt to cross the road again once you’ve left. After you’ve helped the critter on its journey, you can watch from a safe distance to make sure it continues on its way and doesn’t climb back into the road.

Visit the Mid-Atlantic Turtle & Tortoise Society site for tips on handling turtles and helping them across roads.

 

Image by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.



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