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Chesapeake Bay News

May
13
2015

Photo Essay: Education and conservation at the Brock Environmental Center

The sandy shores of Virginia Beach are no stranger to development. As the shoreline curves along the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, homes, hotels and resorts boast Bay-front and oceanfront views. And in 2008, Pleasure House Point—a 118-acre tract of tidal marshes, salt meadows and maritime forest along the shores of the Lynnhaven River—was set to be transformed as well.

Developers were preparing to begin construction on “Indigo Dunes,” an expansive development that would cover nearly every piece of the property with 1,100 condos and townhomes, including two 11-story towers directly along the water’s edge. But if you travel to the land now, no high-rise towers block your view; instead, the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s long, slender Brock Environmental Center sits far back from the riverbank, huddled close to the ground and nestled among the trees and marsh grasses.

Families and student groups visit the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Brock Environmental Center in Virginia Beach, Va., on April 15, 2015. Completed in 2014, the long, thin building features numerous sustainable features such as salvaged materials, zero stormwater runoff and both wind and solar energy generated on site. The Center is currently attempting to become certified under the exacting green building standards of the Living Building Challenge.

Crewmembers from Intus Windows, based in Fairfax, Va., install low-impact triple pane argon-filled windows in the Brock Environmental Center’s community meeting room.

Completed in late 2014, the Brock Environmental Center represents a community effort to protect Pleasure House Point for natural use. According to Christy Everett, head of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Hampton Roads office, preservation of the land began almost as wishful thinking: “It was a suggestion that was very out on a limb—‘Hey, maybe we could stop this development.’”

After bankers foreclosed on the property in 2011, lack of funding, legal uncertainties and apprehension from the community delayed the protection of the land and construction of the Center. Many residents supported conserving the land, but some—concerned the Center would be built too close to the shore—thought it shouldn’t be developed at all. “We went door to door several times, to every house in the neighborhood, to get their feedback,” said Everett. And with the Center now open for public tours, Everett says community support is steadily continuing to grow. “Some people didn’t feel comfortable until they came to the building. But people come today and say, ‘oh, now I understand what you were doing.’”

The Center acts a hub for the Bay Foundation’s hands-on environmental education efforts. A pier hugs the shoreline, where a “floating classroom” waits to take students and teachers on an exploration of the Chesapeake ecosystem. But the building itself presents a different type of lesson to its visitors: one of energy efficiency, resource conservation and modern green building technologies.

Sixth graders from Kemps Landing/Old Donation School return from an educational boat trip with guides from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

Educator Yancey Powell from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) walks with sixth graders (from left) Israel Olukanni, Shaina Kumar, and Delaney Sheridan from Kemps Landing/Old Donation School at CBF's Brock Environmental Center. Situated on the shoreline of Crab Creek, the entire building is raised on pylons to accommodate a 500-year storm event and future sea level rise.

Educator Yancey Powell leads a lesson for students from the Kemps Landing/Old Donation School. Designed for resiliency, the Brock Environmental Center is elevated nearly 14 feet above sea level to accommodate a 500-year storm event and future sea level rise without impacting the building’s structure.

As one of the top green buildings in the nation, the Center is on track to be one of only a handful of buildings certified under the Living Building Challenge each year. The Challenge—described as the “built environment’s most rigorous performance standard”—is based on seven criteria, called petals: place, water, energy, health, happiness, materials, equity and beauty. In order to be certified, the Center must meet several strict requirements over the next year, including producing zero net waste and no net carbon dioxide emissions.

A cistern collects rainwater from the roof of the Brock Environmental Center. 

Cisterns underneath the Brock Environmental Center store rainwater for eventual use. The two 1,600 gallon tanks can hold three weeks’ worth of water for the Center.

Designed to be as resource-efficient as possible, the Center uses solar panels, wind turbines and geothermal wells for all its energy needs—while simultaneously creating ways to educate visitors about resource conservation. When local birding groups voiced their opposition to the turbines, the Bay Foundation tweaked the placement and orientation of the structures. “We did a lot of research into the wind turbines we have, what kind of bird and bat kills happen from which type of turbines in the Chesapeake Bay area,” said Everett. “We keep a spreadsheet that’s monitored every day for potential bird deaths, and there haven’t been any. In that way, we’re contributing to the knowledge about these turbines.”

The Center also uses cutting-edge technology for water use and conservation, including turning rainwater into potable drinking water. “We believe we’re the only public facility in the continental United States that treats its rainwater,” said Everett. “The entire site has zero stormwater runoff. It’s really important to us that any water gets used on site instead of running into local waterways.”

Salvaged gymnasium floors from a local school in Virginia Beach adorn a meeting room.

Artwork made by former Chesapeake Bay Foundation educator Inga Clough Falterman utilizes salvaged live oak from a nearby construction site and is featured in a meeting room.

While the building is newly assembled, the pieces that comprise it tell the history of the surrounding community. Bleachers from a local school, marked by carvings from students of years past, frame the building’s doors and windows. Countertops made from old art tables line the office supply alcove, and corks from champagne bottles serve as handles for drawers and cupboards. A striking mural—made from the pieces of an old, discarded oak tree—hangs against a wall in one of the Center’s few meeting rooms.

Chesapeake Bay Foundation staff members Chris Gorri, left, and Mary Tod Winchester talk in their workspace at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Brock Environmental Center. The long, thin building takes advantage of natural daylight for illumination.

Students from Kemps Landing/Old Donation School and teacher Evelyn Campbell, left, examine double-hinged porch windows at the Brock Environmental Center.

Walking along the Center’s waterfront trail, it can be hard to imagine the vast resort that nearly transformed the landscape. Though the wetland restoration is still in its early stages, signs of wildlife and new growth peek through. “You kind of want it to hurry up and restore,” Everett laughs. But with the marshes, meadows and forests now protected, the land can recover for years to come.

Rain gardens collect water, allowing it to sink into the soil. The Brock Environmental Center’s seven rain gardens absorb any water that runs off the property.

Sixth graders from Kemps Landing/Old Donation School walk from an outdoor learning space near one of two wind turbines. The turbines generate 20 kilowatts of energy, and a little over half of the Center's renewable energy comes from a 38 kilowatt array of solar panels on the roof.

A mockingbird rests at the top of a longleaf pine tree at the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Brock Environmental Center.

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation's Brock Environmental Center rests on the shore of Crab Creek near the Lynnhaven River.

To view more photos, visit the Chesapeake Bay Program's Flickr page.

You can track the status of the Center’s energy and water use through the Bay Foundation’s Brock Environmental Center Building Dashboard.

Images and captions by Will Parson
Text by Stephanie Smith



May
08
2015

Shad abundance surpasses restoration goals in Potomac, Rappahannock

Shad abundance has surged in four Chesapeake Bay rivers, surpassing restoration goals in the Potomac and Rappahannock. While shad populations are critically low along the Atlantic coast, scientists hope to see rising trends continue in these two waterways. Shad spend most of their adult lives in the ocean, migrating into freshwater rivers and streams to spawn. Their return brings food to the Bay in the form of protein-rich eggs, adult shad that can be captured during the spawn and a new generation of shad that can offer forage to striped bass, bluefish and other species as they return to the sea.

Image courtesy born1945/Flickr

Once one of the most valuable fisheries in the Bay, shad populations have declined in recent decades due to pollution, historic overfishing and the construction of dams that block the fish from reaching their spawning grounds. The Bay Program tracks the abundance of American shad in the James, Potomac, Rappahannock, Susquehanna and York rivers as an indicator of watershed health. Collectively, these five waterways account for about 90 percent of the Bay’s shad population, and each has its own population target.

Between 2000 and 2014, shad abundance in the Bay increased from 11 percent to 44 percent of the goal. The Potomac River has seen the most consistent rise in returning shad, but the Rappahannock has also seen notable highs. In 2014, abundance in the Potomac and Rappahannock reached 130 and 110 percent of the rivers’ respective targets.

Scientists attribute these increases to a series of factors, including improvements in water quality; a resurgence in underwater grass beds; moratoriums on shad harvest; an increase in habitat available to migratory fish; stocking efforts that reprint fish to rivers and kick-start local populations; and the overall suitability of the Potomac, in particular, as shad habitat.

“The Potomac River shad population has surpassed its sustainability target,” said Jim Cummins, director of living resources for the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin and co-chair of the Bay Program’s American Shad Indicator Action Team. “But we want to see recovery continue until a robust population is once again providing ecological benefits and supporting a fishery that includes some recreational harvest. Hopefully, in the not too distant future, anglers will be able to enjoy shad on the table and at the end of a line.”

Anglers fish for shad at the confluence of Deer Creek and the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace, Md.

Shad abundance remains negligible in the upper James and Susquehanna and variable in the lower James and York. Some variability is natural, but the continued scarcity of shad in the upper James and Susquehanna can be attributed to large dams. Through the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, the Bay Program has committed to opening more stream miles to migratory fish and improving our capacity to understand the role forage fish populations play in the Bay ecosystem.



May
07
2015

Streamside fencing could improve water quality, livestock health

Preventing livestock from entering streams could improve the health of both local waterways and the animals themselves, according to a new report from the Chesapeake Bay Commission.

Image by Cloud Mine Amsterdam/Shutterstock.com

When hoofed farm animals—such as cattle, horses, pigs, sheep and goats—have clear access to streams, they trample and erode the banks and bottoms of waterways, freeing sediment and nutrients to flow downstream to the Bay. Animal waste contributes additional nutrient pollution, as well as bacteria that can cause human health concerns.

“Livestock exclusion” is an agricultural best management practice (BMP) that uses fences, streamside buffers and alternative water sources to draw animals away from streams and wetlands. The practice benefits not only water quality but the health of the animals themselves: in operations that have installed fences along streams, farmers have reported decreases in injuries and disease in their herds. In the report, the Bay Commission details the benefits of livestock exclusion; describes current efforts throughout its member states of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia; and looks at factors affecting the widespread implementation of these practices.

By lowering the amount of sediment and nutrients flowing to the Bay, practices like livestock exclusion help meet the clean water goals of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, which encompasses the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL).

The report, Healthy Livestock, Healthy Streams: Policy Actions to Promote Livestock Stream Exclusion, is available through the Chesapeake Bay Commission website.



May
04
2015

National Park Service wants to help you 'Find Your Park'

In 2016, the National Park Service (NPS) will celebrate 100 years of sharing America’s special places and helping people make meaningful connections to nature, history and culture. In honor of this centennial birthday, NPS is partnering with the National Park Foundation to launch a public awareness campaign called Find Your Park.

Image by aradaphotography/Shutterstock.com

Through the Find Your Park initiative, the National Park Service is inviting everyone—and especially new audiences—to discover the special places that belong to us all. More than ever, it’s important that the national parks engage not only those who already know and love the parks, but also the next generation of visitors, supporters and advocates who will ensure the preservation and critical relevancy of our nation’s majestic landscapes, rich history and vibrant culture for the next 100 years.

Find Your Park invites the public to see that a park can be more than just a place. It can be a feeling of inspiration; it can be a sense of community. Beyond vast landscapes, the campaign highlights historical, urban, and cultural parks, as well as National Park Service programs that protect, preserve and share nature, culture, and history in communities nationwide.

Here in the Chesapeake Bay region, there are close to 100 national park places and hundreds more community parks and state parks, public access sites, wildlife refuges, water trails, hiking and biking trails, wildlife sanctuaries and celebrations of cultural heritage. The Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail connects many special places where people can have new experiences, make meaningful connections to nature and be inspired.

On National Trails Day, June 6th, the NPS Chesapeake staff and partners will be helping young people have on-the-water experiences with kayak trips around the Chesapeake. You can participate with a John Smith Trail experience at the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center, or one of many other inspiring places, and paddle through settings that look much as they did 400 years ago.

To find Chesapeake experiences and parks near you, use “Chesapeake Explorer”—the official NPS mobile app—or check the Find Your Chesapeake website.

Written by Charles "Chuck" Hunt – Superintendent, Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail



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