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Chesapeake Bay News

Nov
18
2016

Fostering Chesapeake Bay stewardship among regional businesses

A woman smiles while holding a “Chem Free” lawn marker. MOM’s Organic Market, a Businesses for the Bay member, holds an event and educational campaign called “Save the Dandelions” where they educate customers on the effects of synthetic lawn chemicals. (Image credit: MOM’s Organic Market)

As a partnership, we understand that restoration of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed cannot be achieved by one group alone. Tackling the challenges facing the Bay region requires engaging groups from government agencies and non-profits to private landowners and schools. Businesses can also play a significant role in the Bay restoration effort, and a program launched this year aims to encourage and amplify their actions.

In February, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay launched Businesses for the Bay, a membership association for businesses across the Chesapeake Bay watershed. It is the only business association that focuses on the Chesapeake region, and it serves as a forum for business of all sizes to connect, have their voices heard, share best practices and be recognized for their commitment to Bay restoration.

Members pledge to take at least one action annually to help protect and restore the Bay watershed. These are meaningful, measurable contributions that are directly tied to the themes of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, and are therefore part of a much larger, regional effort. In less than a year, Businesses for the Bay’s members are already working on 172 actions. For example, Fareva Richmond, Inc. monitors and maintains songbird next boxes, plants sunflower gardens and reduces stormwater runoff.

Created “by businesses, for businesses,” the program is designed to complement corporate sustainability goals. The program is guided by a steering committee of business members from around the region. Government agencies and non-profit organizations are also welcome to join the association as partners to encourage networking and conservation.

Those who would like to learn more about Businesses for the Bay and get a taste of what it has to offer can attend the December 7th Chesapeake Business Forum in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Open to members and nonmembers alike, the forum is an opportunity to connect and learn from local business leaders about their work, their environmental and social responsibility plans, how businesses and non-profits can work together and much more.

Learn more about Businesses for the Bay, apply to be a member or sign up for the Chesapeake Business Forum.



Nov
17
2016

Photo of the Week: Hands-on lessons about the natural world

Jennifer Carr of the South River Federation identifies leaves with her daughter at the 2016 Chesapeake Watershed Forum, held at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, on September 30, 2016.

A critical piece of Chesapeake Bay restoration is teaching individuals—young and old—about the Bay, its rivers and streams and the lands that surround them. Educational opportunities provide people of all ages with rich natural, cultural, historical and recreational experiences and can inspire lifelong stewardship of the environment. For some students, that includes climbing aboard the steel deck of the Elizabeth River Project’s Learning Barge to learn about blue crabs and marsh periwinkles. For others, it means measuring local water quality in the river than runs mere yards from their school campus in Lititz, Pennsylvania, or using microscopes to identify plankton collected in Baltimore’s Patapsco River.

With close to 18 million people living in the Chesapeake Bay region—a number that continues to grow—education and stewardship is vital to restoring and maintaining the Bay’s health. In the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, Chesapeake Bay Program partners committed to providing each student in the watershed with at least one “meaningful watershed educational experience” in elementary, middle and high school, giving students the knowledge and skills to protect and restore their local waterways.

Learn more about the Bay Program’s efforts to promote environmental literacy.

 

Image by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.



Nov
10
2016

Photo of the Week: Searching for clams in the Chesapeake Bay

Mark Connolly of St. Michaels, Maryland, harvests clams on Maryland's Eastern Shore in the pre-dawn light.

When the hydraulic escalator dredge—shown above being used by Connolly—was first used to harvest soft-shell clams in Maryland in 1951, it quickly led to the harvest of millions of the bivalves each year. At its peak in 1964, the commercial fishery of soft-shell clams reached close to 680,000 bushels. But in the late 1960s and early 1970s, parasites, disease and severe weather collided to contribute to a stark decline in harvests. Despite a slight recovery in the late 1980s, harvests crashed again in 1992 and have yet to recover. Once the most prolific producer of soft-shell clams in the country, commercial harvest of soft-shell clams in Maryland now measures in the hundreds of bushels.

As soft-shell clam harvests plummeted, watermen turned to harvesting the stout razor clam for use as bait for blue crabs. For nearly two decades, razor clams served as an adequate alternative—but in 2003, watermen reported observing unprecedented numbers of dead razor clams. Subsequent surveys estimated that between 70 and 80 percent of the stout razor clams in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay had died, most likely from a fatal blood cancer called DN Disease.

These days, watermen looking to harvest clams in the Chesapeake Bay are focused on the hard clam. Aquaculture operations in the saltier waters of the lower Bay have been particularly successful harvesting the bivalves: Virginia shellfish farmers planted 526 million hard clams in 2015, an increase from 400 million a decade prior.

Learn more about the decline of soft shell and razor clams in the Bay.

 

Image by Keith Rutowski

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.



Nov
10
2016

E-Z Acres makes stream-friendly farming look, well, easy

Michael McMahon walked between two adjacent fields of tall, swaying corn in Homer, New York, to point out an invisible boundary running through his family farm.

Water to the north of that boundary, he explained, eventually flows into Skaneateles Lake, one of the Finger Lakes. But any rain or snow falling to the south ends up in Factory Brook, which flows into the Tioughnioga River, then the Chenango River, the Susquehanna River, and eventually the Chesapeake Bay.

Farm owner Michael McMahon stands at the edge of the Chesapeake Bay watershed, at right, on E-Z Acres Farm in Homer, N.Y. “All in all I think your environment is not only the water and the air and your natural resources,” McMahon said. “I think your environment is also your community and I think you’ve got to be cognizant of your community’s needs and wishes so that you can live in peaceful harmony with them.”

About 30 percent of McMahon’s E-Z Acres Farm, which Michael McMahon owns with his brother Peter McMahon, feeds into the water supply of the city of Syracuse. The larger southern section rests above the groundwater aquifer that is the only water supply for the village of Homer, which abuts the southern end of the farm and is home to 25,000 people. As their business has grown, the McMahons’ awareness of their farm’s potential impact on their neighbors has led them to be fervent stewards and engage their community—for the benefit of both local streams and faraway bodies of water like the Chesapeake Bay.

“The end of our tillable land is only about 200 yards from the big municipal well (in Homer),” McMahon said. “It’s extremely productive ground, but at the same time you could be really doing some damage if you weren’t conscious of it.”

E-Z Acres began with McMahon’s father in 1957, a dairy operation with 160 acres and just eight heifers. Now, their 2,500 acres stretch across much of the valley above Homer in Cortland County.

Workers harvest a field of alfalfa at E-Z Acres Farm, which stretches across much of a valley in Cortland County and sits above an aquifer that is the only source of drinking water for the 25,000 residents of the village of Homer.

“The 1400 head that are on the place today all come from those eight heifers,” McMahon said. “We never purchased any animals.”

McMahon says that early advice from his father made it easier to adopt nutrient management practices when the dairy consolidated four separate facilities into one large operation about 20 years ago.

“Even back, as far back as the 60s, we were taught from our dad that you get manure on all the fields, you don’t just concentrate on where it’s easiest and quickest,” McMahon said. “So it was easy for us to transition to a CAFO [concentrated animal feeding operation] where we have all those plans there in the blue notebooks that tell us exactly what field, what time of the year, how many gallons, all of that.”

In 1997, after the consolidation, the McMahons decided to start testing water for nitrates and phosphorus quarterly at five different sites in the valley.

“Nobody ever told us we had to do this,” McMahon said. “But, we just wanted to know if our agronomic practices were in line, that we weren’t going to see spikes in nitrates in well water.”

The tests are also useful for easing worried minds of residents in Homer, and where foul smells wafting from farm fields sometimes cause worries about water quality.

“You’ll get concerns and typically it’s odor-initiated, when we’re spreading manure,” McMahon said.

Dozens of acres of willow wattles, or shrubs, planted by children from local 4-H clubs line Factory Brook, which flows through E-Z Acres Farm before connecting with the Tioughnioga River and ultimately the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay.

McMahon said E-Z Acres has grown by purchasing neighboring farms as they have come for sale over the past several decades, and their management practices have extended to these lands. For example, he observed that every farm they bought had its own dump—something his father never believed a farm should have. E-Z Acres subsequently cleared all those dumps.

About five miles of a stream called Factory Brook runs through E-Z Acres, and McMahon said that they have made a concentrated effort to protect what is nearest their cropland, which he estimated at about three and a half to four miles. They have let the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) establish riparian buffers on both sides of Factory Brook by bringing children from 4-H clubs to plant willow wattles, or shrubs. They have also granted public access through DEC for a section of Factory Brook.

“In many cases the farms that we purchased, you know people were cropping right up to the edge, you know, spreading their manure and stuff like that,” McMahon said. “Where we do farm near the stream, we keep that land in permanent grass as opposed to turning the soil over and putting in a row crop,” McMahon said.

McMahon credited his home state as becoming a leader in the Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts by first addressing local watershed issues, which meant that his farm already had many practices in place by the time the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) in 2010.

Dairy cattle feed inside a barn at E-Z Acres Farm. The McMahon family started voluntarily testing well water when it consolidated four separate facilities into one concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO, roughly twenty years ago.

Binders containing past and present nutrient management plans fill shelves inside an office at E-Z Acres Farm. McMahon says his family’s stewardship ethic dates back 50 years.

“And maybe I’m just biased because I’m in New York, but we got involved in the Agricultural Environmental Management (AEM) program in New York way back in the 80s when they first thought of it.” McMahon said. “We cleaned up dumps. We looked at chemical storage. We did a lot of things way back before it was ever thought to be mandated. And that was all part of New York State’s own program, and not just for the sake of the Chesapeake but for the sake of all watersheds. And we felt at the time I mean we knew that we sat over an aquifer and that we were kind of responsible for keeping the water clean for all these people who either have private or public water supplies derived from this.”

McMahon says they are motivated by trying to “stay ahead of that curve” and “be good neighbors.” For their efforts, the McMahons were awarded the 2015 Agricultural Environmental Management Award by New York Governor Andrew Cuomo.

E-Z Acres hosts open houses regularly, and every June they welcome all of the fifth grade students in the county—about 400 for each of two days.

“So, that’s a ball,” McMahon said. “In many cases it’s the one and only chance a lot of those kids will have to ever see where milk comes from. So we think it’s a good idea to embrace the community, engage the community and be part of it.”

Text, Photos and Video by Will Parson

To view more photos, visit the Chesapeake Bay Program's Flickr page

Will Parson's avatar
About Will Parson - Will is the Multimedia Specialist for the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of Bakersfield, California, he acquired an interest in photojournalism while studying ecology and evolution at University of California, San Diego. He pursued stories about water and culture as a graduate student at Ohio University's School of Visual Communication, and as an intern at several newspapers in New England before landing in Maryland.



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