Text Size: A  A  A

Chesapeake Bay News


Photo of the Week: Natural beauty and national history converge in Harpers Ferry

Paddlers travel on the Potomac River where it meets the Shenandoah River at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. Described by Thomas Jefferson as “perhaps one of the most stupendous scenes in nature,” the town offers views of three states: West Virginia, Virginia and Maryland.

This scenic spot offers not only boundless natural beauty, but a rich piece of national history. The town was named for Robert Harper, a Quaker from Pennsylvania who in 1747 was sent to erect a mission house in the Shenandoah Valley. On his way, he passed through “The Hole”—the gap in the mountains where the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers meet. He recognized the value of the site for water power and transportation, purchased 126 acres of land at the site, then established a mill and began operating a ferry across the Potomac.

In 1799, construction began on the Harpers Ferry Armory, which produced more than 600,000 muskets, rifles and pistols before 1859, when one of the most famous events in Harpers Ferry history—and indeed, United States history—occurred. Abolitionist activist John Brown and 21 companions led a raid on the armory, hoping to seize weapons from the warehouse to initiate a slave uprising throughout the South. The attempted takeover of the armory was unsuccessful, however, and the event stoked the already tense relationship between the North and South, ultimately hastening the onset of the Civil War.

Today, the town is home to a national historic park where visitors can explore the historic town, visit museums and battlefields or hike the nearby mountains. It’s also home to the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, and is known to hikers as the “psychological halfway point” of the 2,190 mile Appalachian Trail.


Image by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.


$110,000 in grants will help restore urban waters in D.C., Richmond

Two efforts in the Chesapeake Bay watershed will receive close to $110,000 in funding through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Urban Waters Small Grants Program, which supports individuals and organizations in urban areas working to restore their local waterways.

Dominique Skinner from Groundwork Anacostia leads a group of Green Team high schoolers during a free paddle night organized by the Anacostia Watershed Society (AWS) in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 23, 2014. AWS will receive a grant to educate 40 middle school students about how stormwater runoff affects the Anacostia River.

The Anacostia Watershed Society, based in Bladensburg, Maryland, will educate and train 40 middle schoolers from low-income communities in the District of Columbia. With 10-week programs in the fall and spring, students will learn about stormwater runoff through a variety of activities, including canoe trips along the Anacostia River, tours of green infrastructure projects and hands-on restoration.

Virginia Commonwealth University will develop a community greening and green infrastructure plan for its two campuses in downtown Richmond, Virginia, as well as the Richmond Arts District. The partnership-focused effort will begin with an assessment of structures and locations that would support green infrastructure projects. Then, community meetings and an educational awareness campaign will inform residents of local water quality issues, obtain their feedback on the plan’s development and suggest ways they can reduce stormwater runoff.

Since its creation in 2012, the Urban Waters Small Grants Program has awarded close to $6.6 million to 114 organizations across the United States. Grants are awarded every two years, with individual awards up to $60,000. In addition to the two projects inside the Bay watershed, the program will fund projects from 20 organizations in 16 other states.

Learn more.


Chesapeake Forest Champions commended for efforts to plant, protect trees

Dr. Jim Finley, Director of the Center for Private Forests at Penn State, speaks after receiving the Lifetime Achievement Award during the Forest Champions ceremony at the Chesapeake Watershed Forum in Shepherdstown, W.Va., on Sept. 30, 2016.  (Photos by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program)

Across the Chesapeake Bay region, an average of 100 acres of forest are lost each day, which can mean less habitat for wildlife and more pollution flowing into rivers and streams. Conserving forests is crucial in protecting clean water and vital habitats, which is why the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay works to honor those who have made it their mission to protect these important landscapes. At its eleventh annual Chesapeake Watershed Forum, the nonprofit, with support from the U.S. Forest Service, recognized four Chesapeake Forest Champions: a coordinator of streamside forest buffers, a partnership planting trees in Maryland’s Allegany County, a landowner duo providing habitat to wildlife and a leader in Pennsylvania forest stewardship.

Anne Marie Clark, Watershed Coordinator of the Robert E. Lee Soil and Water Conservation District, was named Most Effective at Engaging the Public for her work establishing streamside forest buffers in Amherst County, Virginia. By implementing 28 buffer projects through the Amherst Tree Buffer Program, she has helped to plant thousands of trees. But Clark does more than just plant: she also returns to each site to check on the trees’ health, helping her projects meet an average survival rate of 90 percent.

Craig Highfield, left, and Sally Claggett, right, stand with awarded Forest Champions, from left, Dr. Jim Finley of the Center for Private Forests at Penn State, Dan Hedderick of Maryland Forest Service (and his daughter), Anne Marie Clark of the Robert E. Lee Soil and Water Conservation District, and Laura and Mike Jackson of Bedford County, Pennsylvania.

A group of partners in Allegany County, Maryland, was honored with Greatest On-the-Ground Impact. Through their efforts, the partnership has helped plant and maintain 85 acres of new forest in just four years—far exceeding their original goal of eight acres per year. By planting trees on both public and private lands, they are able to engage the community and educate local schoolchildren about their efforts. The group was represented by Dan Hedderick from the Maryland Forest Service, and also includes Angela Patterson from the Allegany County Department of Planning Services and Dan DeWitt from the Allegany County Department of Public Works.

Landowners Mike and Laura Jackson of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, were recognized as Exemplary Forest Stewards. The 113 acres of land the pair manages was once a dairy farm that had been in Laura’s family for generations. Over the years, timber had been harvested, trees had been defoliated by gypsy moths and invasive species were threatening to take over. But the duo was committed to leaving the land better than they received it. They’ve worked to bring native plants back to the land, providing habitat for pollinators. And with the help of the Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Pennsylvania Game Commission, they’ve provided habitat for the American woodcock and the golden-winged warbler.

Dr. Jim Finley received the Lifetime Achievement Award for his decades of work encouraging stewardship of Pennsylvania’s forests. In the 1990s, Finley led the creation of the now-renowned Pennsylvania Forest Stewardship Program, in which participants receive 40 hours of training on forestry and natural resources, then go on to share that knowledge with their communities. Finley also worked with Service Foresters at Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources to lead educational workshops throughout the state, resulting in the creation of more than 25 woodland owner associations. Now, Finley leads the Center for Private Forests at Penn State, where he supports forest-related research, educates private landowners on the legacy of their land and informs the public on how forests connect with and benefit our everyday lives.

Learn more about the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay’s Forests for the Bay program.


Photo of the Week: Finding a balance for white-tailed deer

A white-tailed deer stands at forest's edge near a resting flock of Canada geese at Terrapin Nature Park in Stevensville, Maryland. Also known as the Virginia deer, the white-tailed deer gets its name from the white underside of its tail, which it will raise like a flag when alarmed.

In the early 1900s, unrestricted hunting, loss of forests and a rapid increase in development lead to a sharp decline in white-tailed deer populations. Over the next few decades, conservation programs in many states helped re-establish deer populations in the Eastern United States. But just as deer populations had previously suffered, the numbers of their natural predators—wolves, coyotes and mountain lions—fell, too. And as deer populations rebounded, a lack of these major predators allowed herds to grow exponentially, bringing with them a multitude of growing pains, including damage to agricultural crops and gardens, a loss of diversity in plant species and dangerous deer-vehicle collisions.

Scientists refer to the maximum population size that can thrive in a given habitat as that area’s “biological carrying capacity”: the amount of individuals in a species that can survive indefinitely on the food, water and other necessities available in the environment. But another concept is the “cultural carrying capacity”: the number of individuals of a species that can coexist comfortably with the local human population. Deer management experts across the Chesapeake Bay watershed are working to solve the complex puzzle of maintaining deer populations at levels that both support a healthy ecosystem and strike a balance with humans.

Learn more about the white-tailed deer, or learn about deer management programs in Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.


Image by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.

410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved