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Chesapeake Bay News: Science

May
20
2016

Photo of the Week: Protecting a wetland from invasive species

Zach Bruce, center, and fellow Maryland Conservation Corps members, from left, Taylor Lundstrom, Kevin McNamara and Rachel Werderits, remove invasive trees of heaven and garlic mustard plants at the site of a wetland restoration on Church Creek in Annapolis, Maryland.

Many wetlands in the Chesapeake Bay region have been severely altered by the presence of plants and animals that have been introduced there, whether accidentally or on purpose. Invasive species like the tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima) and garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) can cause harm when they establish themselves at the expense of native plants, encroaching on their habitat.

Once an invasive species is established, it can be incredibly difficult to eradicate; controlling invasive species takes resources, cooperation and commitment, which is why it’s crucial to prevent them from being introduced in the first place. Native trees, shrubs and flowers play a vital role in a healthy ecosystem, in part by serving as food and habitat for native critters and insects.

Learn about how you can choose native plants for your own backyard to provide food and habitat to native insects & critters.

 

Image by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.



May
17
2016

University of Maryland measures improvement in Chesapeake Bay health

Scientists at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) measured a modest improvement in Chesapeake Bay health in 2015, once again giving the estuary a “C” in their annual Chesapeake Bay Report Card.

The Chesapeake Bay is seen near Annapolis, Md., on Sept. 4, 2015. The Bay's health improved last year according to an annual report card released by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

Although the “C” grade has remained the same since 2012, the score of 53 percent marks one of the three highest since 1986: only 1992 and 2002 scored as high or higher. But unlike 2015, both those years accompanied major droughts, and according to UMCES researchers, that makes these results particularly notable.

“We’d expect to see improvements after a drought year because nutrients aren’t being washed into the Bay, fueling algae blooms and poor water quality,” said Bill Dennison, Vice President for Science Applications at UMCES, in a release. “However, in 2015 streamflow was below normal, but nowhere near the drought conditions in 1992 and 2002. Thus, the high score for 2015 indicate that we’re making progress reducing what’s coming off the land.”

Bill Dennison, Vice President for Science Applications at UMCES, announces findings of the 2015 Chesapeake Bay Report Card at the Annapolis Maritime Museum on May 17, 2016.

The Bay Health Index is based on several indicators of Bay health, including water clarity and dissolved oxygen, the amount of algae and nutrients in the water, the abundance of underwater grasses and the strength of certain fish stocks, including blue crab and striped bass. Most of these indicators improved over the previous year; only phosphorus pollution worsened from 2014 to 2015.

"The information being released today by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science is very positive and consistent with the trends the Chesapeake Bay Program has been witnessing over the past few years,” said Nick DiPasquale, Director of the Chesapeake Bay Program. “We should take the opportunity to celebrate these results, but we should also recognize that the long term success of our work to restore water quality and the health of this vitally important ecosystem will depend on stepping up and sustaining our efforts over the long-term to reduce nutrient and sediment pollution discharges to streams and rivers throughout the watershed."  

Learn more.



May
13
2016

Photo of the Week: Warm rains spring salamanders into action

A spotted salamander rests near the edge of a vernal pool in Edgewater, Maryland. Named for their bright yellow spots, these amphibians thrive in the swamps and bottomland forests of the Chesapeake Bay region.

The first warm spring rains prompt the annual migrations of these salamanders, along with wood frogs and other vernal pool breeders—species that depend on these small, seasonal bodies of water to reproduce. Vernal pools are short-lived forest ponds, fed by snow, rain or groundwater. They only stay wet for about seven months, just long enough for a cascade of frogs and salamanders to use them as a home for their developing young.

Areas that house vernal pools are often vulnerable to development, endangering the breeding grounds of critters like the spotted salamander, which will return to the same pool year after year to reproduce. But conserved lands like the Forests Pools Preserve near Carlisle, Pennsylvania, provide an oasis for these ephemeral ponds—and the species that depend on them.

 

Photo by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.



May
05
2016

Uncovering beauty in Washington, D.C.

Over a hundred volunteers signed up to clean up the Anacostia River at Kenilworth Park as a part of the Anacostia Watershed Society’s Earth Day Cleanup on April 23, 2016. From left to right: Ryan Taaffe, Zubin Gadhoke, Fajr Chestnut, Ryanna Robinson, Jiffa Gborgla, and Kristin May.

It’s a gray Saturday morning in Washington, D.C. The sky is full of clouds, threatening rain, but Kenilworth Park isn’t empty. In fact, a large group of people are gathered around a tent in the park’s large, open field. But they’re not here for flag football or barbecuing; they’re here to work.

Today is the Anacostia Watershed Society (AWS) Earth Day Cleanup, and all of these people came out to Kenilworth Park to volunteer. As the overcast sky begins to shed its first drops of rain, they break off into smaller groups and head out to different sections of the park. Some begin scouring the field for trash, others head toward the Anacostia River—which cuts through the park—and some begin working on one of the river’s smaller tributaries.

While the Kenilworth group is large, they’re just a small portion of the 2,400 volunteers who signed up to take part in today’s cleanup at 31 different sites around D.C. and Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties in Maryland. Today seems like a large-scale cleanup effort—because it is—but AWS’s day of action is part of an even larger network of cleanups called Project Clean Stream, hosted by the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay. For the past 13 years, the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay has coordinated cleanups around the Chesapeake region. This year, cleanups ran from Sandbridge, Virginia, all the way up to Westfield, Pennsylvania.

A sampling of the trash volunteers collected along the Anacostia River at Kenilworth Park in Washington, D.C. on April 23, 2016.

Volunteers pilled all of their collected trash in the middle of the park for pickup. All total, they collected 103 bags of trash and 150 pounds of bulk trash during the cleanup.

For some of the volunteers at Kenilworth Park, this is their first time participating in a cleanup. Many were drawn to the event through Broccoli City Fest, a local concert that offered tickets to people in exchange for community service at a number of designated locations. One volunteer, Hilina Kibron, remarked, “I probably wouldn’t have done it on my own time. This actually forces me to do it.”

Yasmeen Warner: “I knew it was a Broccoli City event, and I thought it would be a cool way to help the community… It’s the heart of the city, and it’d be nice if it would be cleaned up and we could use it.”

Celine Guichardan: “[I hope this event brings] more awareness about littering and pollution, because I didn’t even realize how bad it was until I was out there picking up garbage—there’s so much of it. I probably saw more garbage covering the ground than the actual earth by the river.”

For experts and newcomers alike, the day is a learning opportunity. After just a few hours of picking up bottle after bottle and a seemingly endless stream of Styrofoam containers, volunteers reflected on personal changes they wanted to make, and hopes they had for others. After cleaning up plastic bottles and even an oil drum, William Klein said, “I hope that it will bring more awareness about littering and trying prevent that so in the future we won’t have to have days like these because people will be more sustainable.”

Despite the trash, many saw the beauty of Kenilworth Park and the Anacostia River, and wanted others to see that as well. They expressed hope about the value that a clean natural space could bring to the community and its residents. Fajr Chestnut, volunteering with her young daughter Ryanna, summed it up best: “The river means health and sustainability and economic development, and it’s the basis for the community. Once it’s to the level where it’s supposed to be, people will be able to have recreation. It’s bettering the community; it’s making it look better, making it sound better, making it feel better. So it’s important to have a clean river.”

Isaiah Thomas: “I love the environment. I want to help out and be a part of positive change.”

Matt Schoenfeld: “One thing we’ve noticed is we’re picking up a ton of bottles and Styrofoam. That’s the stuff that people can use other things for instead. So maybe people will stop using the plastic bottles and stuff like that. Because that’s 90 percent of what we’ve been picking up today.”

Ty Hodge: “My hope is that people who typically don’t come out and enjoy the river are out here this morning and understand how the way we interact with the river is important. You know that when you’re in the park and you eat and don’t dispose of your stuff appropriately that all of that ends up in the river, which is where a lot of our drinking water comes from, for some people a lot of food, et cetera. So it’s important for them to see this and how what we do impacts the health of the river and the community.”

Alysia Scofield with one of her students, Percy Kyd-Bruneau: “I think it’s really important to bring kids out here because I think the solutions that are going to need to be created are in their hands. I think the more they come out and see the problems and get really acquainted with the difficulties, the more that they’ll be able to become passionate about solving the problems.”

Naomi Hawk (left): “Sometimes we miss the point with cleanups because we forget to educate people as to why the litter is here in the first place. If we don’t tell people to ultimately stop littering, we’ll be out here every year picking up trash. As opposed to telling people, once they get back home, to put the stuff in the trash can.”
Serena Butcher (right): “I think [the Anacostia River] has so much potential… Hopefully we’ll make it cleaner, but also, I’m definitely going to make sure I don’t use plastic bottles because I’m finding a lot of those, and Styrofoam cups.”

Horus Plaza: “I’m out here to volunteer. I want to help out—help the community—and pick up the trash.”

Catherine Capotosto: “This is my first time [doing a river cleanup]. I think we’re finding a lot more stuff than everyone thought we would find and it’s definitely different [than I expected].”

Lowell George: “I live in D.C. not far from the Anacostia, so when I go for runs I go by it and see all the trash. For me, it has a lot of opportunity because it’s this great river running through a great city. But it requires some work. To me it holds a lot of promise.”

Dominique Skinner, site leader: “I want people to own the river and have appreciation for it as much as I do. Whether that’s going and recreating on the river, whether it’s walking the trails along the river or if its continuing to do cleanups once or twice or three times a year—that’s what I want people to get out of today.”


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