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Bay Blog: Annapolis

Apr
26
2012

A beautiful morning cleaning up Spa Creek

When I moved to Annapolis last August, I wanted to be located near water and close to where I work at the Bay Program’s Eastport office.  I moved into an apartment adjacent to Truxtun Park on Spa Creek.  I enjoy kayaking, and the park has a boat ramp.  In pretty short order, I met several people from the Spa Creek Conservancy, a local volunteer group working to restore and protect the creek. The Conservancy may be small in numbers, but it is huge in heart and enthusiasm.

Spa Creek Conservancy members after cleanup

(Image courtesy Spa Creek Conservancy)

On Saturday, April 14, I had the opportunity to join with other Conservancy members in a Project Clean Stream cleanup. When we assembled at the Chesapeake Children’s Museum, we were joined by a troop of Daisy Scouts out for a day of learning about the environment. They were as energetic as a swarm of bumble bees buzzing around a patch of wildflowers. 

Along with the water, coffee, donuts, gloves and plastic bags at the volunteer sign-in table, we also set up a great aerial photo of the Spa Creek watershed that showed our location and all the areas that drain into the creek. The world looks a lot different from that vantage point.  It was interesting to see how much of the area was covered by roads, rooftops and parking lots. These hard surfaces prevent rainwater from soaking into the soil to recharge streams and groundwater supplies.

During the cleanup, there was evidence everywhere of our consumer-based economy: plastic bottles, aluminum cans, fast food wrappers, plastic shopping bags, certain unmentionables, and even an occasional tire or two. As Aldo Leopold, a noted naturalist and conservationist once said, “We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us. When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.”  Those words are perhaps even more meaningful now than when he first spoke them more than 70 years ago.

What I’ve witnessed working with the incredible members of the Spa Creek Conservancy, the Watershed Stewards Academy, the South River Federation and other local, civic-minded environmental groups throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed is a strong desire to re-establish that sense of community where we live, work, play and pray – to think about how nature functions and why we need to find ways to live in harmony with it.  We get lost in our own sense of self-importance as we travel at 60 miles per hour (or more) trying to get from one place to another. Often, we don’t allow ourselves to spend a few hours a week seeking to understand nature. To paraphrase another great thinker, “We don't value what we don't know; we don't protect what we don't value."  

The Spa Creek cleanup was a good way to reconnect with nature and see firsthand how, perhaps unintentionally or unconsciously, we abuse it.  Once we understand that, we will all be motivated to do something about it.

Nick DiPasquale's avatar
About Nick DiPasquale - Nick has nearly 30 years of public policy and environmental management experience in both the public and private sectors. He previously served as Deputy Secretary in the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Director of the Environmental Management Center for the Brandywine Conservancy in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania and as Secretary of the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control.



Jul
21
2011

Teaching kids about pollution through the ReSET program

As I strode to the front of Ms. Molly Moran's second grade class at Annapolis Elementary School one June morning, I was confident in my lesson plan, so elegantly simple that I didn't even need the 3X5 index card in my shirt pocket on which I had it drawn out.

My former boss at EPA's Wetlands Division, John Meagher, had invited me to talk about what I do in my work through the ReSET program he directs. ReSET is a D.C.-based non-profit volunteer organization that partners working and retired scientists, engineers and technicians with elementary school teachers to improve science motivation and literacy. ReSET's goal is to introduce children in the classroom to science, engineering and technology as being enjoyable and exciting (i.e., fun!).

John did his lesson first.  I had scoped out his topic and identified a meaningful connection between his talk and mine.  He was going to teach a hands-on, desk-top laboratory lesson about buoyancy, including a key vocabulary word: "gravity."  (Did you know that a lacrosse ball sinks in fresh water but floats in salt water?)

I decided that was my link.  The audience would be primed.  I had decided on the audience participation approach, to put the pen into their little hands.

It was my turn. On the flip chart at the front of the class, I drew a hillside – a single black line – with wavy blue water at the bottom of the hill: the Bay, just like right outside the classroom window.  A stick-figure person.  A lolli-pop green tree.  A cloud.  A fish in the water.  A swimmer.  Rain.

I asked the class: "Where does the water go when it rains?"

The class: "Down to the Bay!"

"Why?"

One smart kid got it right: "Gravity!"

"How many of you have or know people who have dogs?"  All the hands went up.  Another volunteer drew a red dog on the hillside.

Then the clincher: "What do dogs do when you take them out to walk in the morning?"

The entire chorus:  "THEY POOP!"

Ms. Moran interrupted: "Oh, Mr. Mike, you just got them to say their favorite word!"  The audience, giggling, was wrapped.  "Wait!" I said, fumbling around the front desk, "There's no brown marker!"  Ms. Moran stopped the lesson until she could find one.

There was no shortage of volunteers to draw the little brown pile behind the dog.  It was not exactly to scale.

"Where does that poop go when it rains?"  "To the Bay"  "Why?"  "Gravity!"

"How do you think the fish and the swimmer feel about that?" "Yech!"

"What do you think you can do about that?" They knew that answer too.

And the lesson was over.  I haven't had that much fun since the last time I caught a steelhead on a fly rod in a snowstorm.

Seriously, if you like kids half as much as I do and care about the future of the world, combine the two by volunteering with John for the ReSET program.  John has the lesson plans; you and the kids have the fun.

About Mike Fritz - Mike Fritz is with the U.S. EPA at the Chesapeake Bay Program office.



Jul
07
2011

Dog poop happens: Learn how to deal with it!

Walking my two high-spirited Boykin Spaniels, Rosebud and Daisy, has special meaning to me. I have become the self-appointed advocate for picking up pet waste in Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Many call me the “queen of poop” (with a chuckle); it’s a title of distinction, as far as I’m concerned!  But you might wonder how I earned that title and why I think it is a good thing? (My parents certainly do!)

I encourage everybody to walk with their four-legged friends. It’s good for both your health and your dog’s. Many popular routes in Anne Arundel County now have pet waste stations to encourage you to pick up your dog’s poop. Picking up pet waste is critical to achieving a healthy Chesapeake Bay.  Pet waste can be carried by rainwater and groundwater to the Chesapeake Bay, where it becomes harmful pollution.

I developed an interactive web site called Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Pet Walks, which maps the locations of pet waste stations in the area. You can even visit the website from your mobile device while you’re out walking your dog to find the nearest pet waste station.

If you know of a pet waste station that isn’t included on the map, or if you’d like to learn how to set up a pet waste program in your community, please contact me at winterstime@aol.com.

Meanwhile, please take a walk with your dog today. And remember: POOP HAPPENS…Deal with it!

Julie Winters's avatar
About Julie Winters - Julie Winters works with the Environmental Protection Agency at the Chesapeake Bay Program. She is also an Anne Arundel County Master Watershed Steward. Through her role with this program, Julie helps raise awareness about the importance of picking up pet waste and helps promote pet waste stations throughout the county.



Apr
26
2011

What flows into storm drains?

We've been getting a lot of rain in the Chesapeake Bay region this spring. One day after a rain storm a few weeks ago, we decided to go around the neighborhood to see what trash we could find on the street.

After an hour, we had picked up about half a garbage bag full of trash. Our route along an Annapolis street led us to a storm drain that was located directly above a small creek. All of the trash we picked up that day would eventually have gone into the storm drain and then into the creek it flows to. How? Rain!

Rain picks up trash and other pollutants and washes them into storm drains, which flow to our local streams, creeks and rivers. And our local waterways flow to the Chesapeake Bay. This is why you should always pick up your trash!

Kristen Foringer's avatar
About Kristen Foringer - Need some text



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