Text Size: A  A  A

Bay Blog: outdoor classroom

Apr
26
2017

Chesapeake Bay Environmental Literacy Summit: Education gets outside

Nestled between Washington, D.C., and Baltimore, Maryland, the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center boasts native gardens, picturesque benches next to flowering trees that hum with bees, study sites for the center’s biologists and plenty of rivers, forests and walking trails for the public. Last Wednesday, the refuge played a role in ensuring a new generation of research scientists and nature lovers by hosting the Chesapeake Bay Program’s Leadership Summit on Environmental Literacy.

An educator from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (CBF) shows students how to conduct a cast net survey at CBF’s headquarters in Annapolis, Md., last year. Outdoor environmental learning activities known as Meaningful Watershed Education Experiences have been shown to increase overall academic performance.

The summit centered on the environmental literacy outcome of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement, in which Bay Program partners—which include federal and state agencies, local governments, non-profit organizations, communities and academic institutions—committed to the goal to “enable every student in the region to graduate with the knowledge and skills to act responsibly to protect and restore their local watershed.”

Attendees were delegates from the education departments, environmental or natural resource departments and school districts of D.C., Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. Representatives from federal agencies, nonprofits, outdoor centers, and educational organizations throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed joined in discussion and collaborated at each table. 

Remarks from Nick DiPasquale, Director of the Chesapeake Bay Program, and Brad Knudsen, Patuxent Research Refuge Manager, kicked off the day. Both began by reminiscing spending sunrise-to-sunset childhood days playing outdoors, with Knudsen expressing concern over whether today’s children would be able to do the same.

“Most kids now experience the outdoors through sports,” Knudsen said. “Sports are great, but what are the odds that at 60 they’ll still be playing soccer? If they are exposed to birdwatching, nature hikes, [nature becomes] a lifelong love and activity.”

Fourth grade students from Granby Elementary School in Norfolk, Va., learn how to measure water quality aboard the Elizabeth River Project’s Learning Barge in 2015.

To give today’s children outdoor memories and ensure a robust outdoors in which to have them, education leaders from across the watershed shared stories and discussed how to foster success in each jurisdiction. “Me – We” is the handily descriptive pronunciation for Meaningful Watershed Education Experiences (MWEE), the formal environmental education component in place in elementary, middle and high schools and which has been shown to increase overall academic performance. MWEEs—which last weeks to months and morph from classroom learning to outdoor experiences and back again—give students a sense of place within the watershed as a whole, while providing real-world applications for science, math, history, reading and art.

The afternoon concluded with attendees discussing how best to tackle environmental literacy in their particular locality. A major component of environmental literacy is establishing a sense of the full watershed. Covering some 64,000 square miles, the Chesapeake Bay watershed stretches from New York down to Virginia and includes land-locked areas of Pennsylvania and West Virginia. A school in coastal Virginia might create a Bay-focused MWEE in partnership with a local nonprofit, while a class in rural Pennsylvania might work with a local farm, a conservancy and their conservation district to develop a sense of pollution prevention and groundwater protection on their own school grounds. Watershed protection works when people understand the interworking nature of the system and decide to act locally: each area taking pride in their own land, their own streams, their local community. Environmentally literate citizens result in healthier communities; healthier local communities result in a healthier bay.



Sep
26
2012

Watershed Wednesday: Irvine Nature Center (Baltimore County, Md.)

Tree stumps to step over and drum circles to join. Slate easels to draw on and animals to meet. Hollow logs to climb through and dirt to dig in.

What kid wouldn’t love it here?

Image courtesy Irvine Nature Center/Facebook

The Irvine Nature Center in Owings Mills, Md., has joined a growing list of nature-inspired organizations that encourage kids to explore, respect and protect the environment. Thanks to a growing body of research that supports the benefits of unstructured play and child-nature interaction, places like the Irvine Center—with its trails, garden and outdoor classroom—are popping up all over, getting kids to play in fields and forests instead of on plastic and asphalt.

The idea? When given the chance to roam and run in natural places, kids will learn about and come to love the outdoors, becoming curious environmentalists and new stewards of our watershed.

Image courtesy Irvine Nature Center/Facebook

The Irvine Center’s exhibit hall, green building and 116 acres of woods and meadows are open to the public; the Irvine Center’s outdoor classroom is open to members and to those who participate in the organization’s programs.

More from Irvine:

  • Use this leaf hunt or PumpkinFest as your first excuse to visit Irvine! And check out the center’s calendar of events for more family-friendly programs.
  • Schedule an overnight campout at Irvine. Your friends and family will love the chance to take in the great outdoors in Baltimore County’s beautiful Caves Valley.
  • Know a teacher itching to bring nature into the classroom? Irvine staff—and their animals!—lead student programs in area schools and offer instruction to teachers on how to integrate environmental education into their lesson plans.
  • Adults love nature, too! Look into Irvine’s continuing education courses, which offer adults the chance to learn about ecology and environmental education.
Caitlin Finnerty's avatar
About Caitlin Finnerty - Caitlin Finnerty is the Communications Staffer at the Chesapeake Research Consortium and Chesapeake Bay Program. Caitlin grew up digging for dinosaur bones and making mud pies in Harrisburg, Pa. Her fine arts degree landed her environmental field work jobs everywhere from Oregon to Maryland. Now settled in Baltimore, she is eagerly expecting her first child while creating an urban garden oasis on her cement patio.



410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved