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Bay Blog: planting

Apr
20
2017

Five ways volunteers can help protect the Chesapeake Bay

Caring for the environment is a year-round activity. But as temperatures rise, flowers bloom and the natural world springs to life, it can be easier to get outside and get involved. In the Chesapeake Bay region, there are countless opportunities to volunteer, no matter your interests or age level. April is National Volunteer Month, and to celebrate, we’re highlighting a few ways you can help protect the environment that surrounds us.

From left, Liz Stelmach, Ally Fletcher, Caleigh Fletcher and Anna Moyer combine efforts to put a large piece of pipe into a dumpster after a group of volunteers extracted it from Cat Branch Creek in Annapolis, Md., on April 11, 2015. Volunteers tackled the Cat Branch site as part of a 2015 Project Clean Stream event, removing over 4,000 pounds of trash.

1. Pick up trash
Litter is often one of the most visible forms of pollution we encounter in our day-to-day lives. Trash cleanups collect this litter—from plastic soda bottles to old tires—from sites across the Chesapeake Bay region, often along the shores of the watershed’s rivers and streams.

One of the area’s largest cleanup initiatives is the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay’s Project Clean Stream. In 2016, close to 3.3 million pounds of trash were collected at more than 3,700 Project Clean Stream sites. While the bulk of events take place on the first Saturday in April, cleanups continue to be held through the beginning of June.

Another event, held on the first Saturday in June each year, is Clean the Bay Day. Sponsored by the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, the cleanup takes place in Virginia along the shores of the Bay and its rivers and streams. Since its start in 1989, close to 6.4 million pounds of trash have been removed from almost 6,900 miles of the state’s shorelines.

Natasha Beck and her daughter Lauren Beck of Girl Scouts Troop 81534 participate in a tree planting in Walkersville, Md., on Oct. 25, 2014.

2. Plant a tree
By improving air quality, trapping water pollution and providing habitat for wildlife, trees play a critical role in a healthy ecosystem. Landowners can individually plant trees along their property, but many organizations also host tree planting events, during which volunteers can assist in planting large numbers of trees on both private and public lands.

Celebrations like Earth Day (April 22) and Arbor Day (April 28) are particularly popular for tree plantings, but events can be found throughout the spring and fall. In the Chesapeake region, April, May and October tend to be the best times for plantings, both for tree survivability and for the comfort level of volunteers working outside. To find a tree planting opportunity near you, you can contact your local watershed organization or check the events calendar of organizations like the Chesapeake Bay Foundation.

Chemistry students from Warwick High School sample Lititz Run in Lancaster County, Pa., during a biannual field trip that visited eight sites along the stream on May 1, 2015.

3. Be a citizen scientist
Gathering data about the natural world helps scientists and decision-makers detect changes over time and better understand the complex workings of the Bay ecosystem. But time and resources limit the number of sites and frequency of monitoring, especially in the smaller creeks and streams that thread through the region. Networks of trained volunteers can assist in activities like measuring water quality, tracking wildlife and identifying invasive species.

Organizations throughout the Chesapeake Bay region engage citizen scientists in their efforts. The Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay’s RiverTrends program, for example, provides training to water quality monitoring volunteers in the Virginia portion of the Bay watershed. Other initiatives like Project Noah use mobile apps to track sightings of wildlife. Contact your local watershed organization to learn about citizen science opportunities in your area.

Jennifer Stilley, Nature Center Aide at Battle Creek Cypress Swamp Sanctuary, holds a barred owl that lives at the sanctuary's nature center in Prince Frederick, Md., on Oct. 12, 2014. The owl was struck by a car in 2012, and its wing was amputated, making it unfit for release.

4. Support wildlife
Hundreds of species depend on the Chesapeake Bay and its surrounding region, whether as seasonal visitors or as permanent residents. A variety of factors affect the ability of these critters to thrive, from the availability of sufficient food and habitat to surviving in a world of unfamiliar, man-made obstacles. Wildlife organizations and refuges provide support and sanctuary to thousands of animals each year, and they rely on volunteers to help carry out their mission.

Organizations like the Wildlife Center of Virginia assist in wildlife rehabilitation, using volunteers to transport, treat and care for injured wildlife. Volunteers help City Wildlife in D.C. care for urban wildlife, track injured migratory birds and monitor duck nests in the city.

The Chesapeake Bay watershed is also home to fifteen national wildlife refuges, protecting the forests, fields, wetlands and shorelines that wildlife depend on. Many of these refuges have “Friends” groups—such as Friends of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge—that provide volunteer opportunities like leading nature walks, helping with trail maintenance and staffing information desks.

Alex Dixon shows off his new diamondback terrapin traits during a lesson for fourth grade students from Federal Hill Preparatory School at Masonville Cove Environmental Education Center in Baltimore, Md., on March 23, 2016.

5. Educate others
More than three million students in kindergarten through 12th grade live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed—and soon, they’ll be the caretakers of its well-being. Teaching these students the knowledge and skills they need to care for the natural world builds the foundation for future environmental stewardship.

That’s why groups across the region are focused on providing meaningful outdoor experiences to students, connecting them with the environment that surrounds them. Audubon Naturalist Society near D.C., for example, uses volunteer teaching assistants to help lead lessons about planting trees or stream science. And volunteers can help the Sultana Education Foundation on the Bay’s Eastern Shore by both leading environmental education programs and working aboard the organization’s replica 1768 Royal Navy schooner.

 

Have another favorite way you like to volunteer? Let us know in the comments! Or if you’re looking for an opportunity near you, use our Join a Group page to find watershed organizations in your area.

Images by Will Parson

Stephanie Smith's avatar
About Stephanie Smith - Stephanie is the Web Content Manager at the Chesapeake Bay Program. A native of the Midwest, she received her Bachelor’s in Professional Writing from Purdue University and Master of Science degree from the University of Michigan. Stephanie’s lifelong love of nature motivates her to explore solutions to environmental problems and teach others what they can do to help.



Dec
08
2014

Restoration Spotlight: Fostering environmental stewardship through forest restoration

Forests are critical to the health of the Chesapeake Bay—they protect clean water and air, provide habitat to wildlife and support the region’s economy. However, since European settlement of the region in the 17th century, deforestation has taken a toll on the once thriving forests of the mid-Atlantic region. Human influences such as development and parcelization have reduced forest acreage from 95 to about 45 percent of historic coverage.

Deforestation in the Bay region may seem a problem that is too complex to tackle, but one man, dubbed the modern-day Johnny Appleseed, is proof that a little curiosity, passion and hard work can have profound effects on the environment. John Smucker, a Technology Education teacher at Northwest Middle School in Taneytown, Maryland, has become a catalyst for reforestation efforts, melding his engineering experience with restoration initiatives.

Smucker recalls the moment 10 years ago that sparked his interest in forest restoration. “It all started behind my house with a reforestation effort, but all of the trees that were planted slowly died. I didn’t like that so I did a lot of research to help [the trees] out and fell in love with the process, which led me to start dropping acorns into empty tree shelters,” said Smucker.

The moment created a ripple effect that resulted in Smucker spearheading forest restoration by organizing volunteer plantings and entering into a partnership with Mount Saint Mary’s University and the Francis Scott Key Center. Both locations provide space for Smucker to grow the thousands of trees he uses for plantings. 

Smucker spends about 700 hours every year in all aspects of creating riparian buffers, like meeting with landowners, auguring the holes, organizing the volunteers and also conducting the most critical part of the process Smucker says, maintenance. Plantings are held on Saturdays during April, May and October – the most opportune months for tree survivability and comfortable outdoor temperatures for volunteers to work.

When choosing planting locations, Smucker explains, “Being a grower really is a game changer for me, because I can fully understand what the trees need to survive.” Once a site is selected, he samples the soil, observes what plant species are in the area, spends time in his greenhouses flagging all of the appropriate trees for the site and rallies his volunteer base around the planting.

When it comes to tree plantings, the name of the game is fun and education. Many of his volunteers are young people who are in a mindset to learn. Each planting is preceded with an ecology lesson highlighting the importance of riparian zones, stream shading and nutrient removal. “As a middle school teacher it is important to organize the event so it’s fun and rewarding, because if they get frustrated, they will associate that frustration with tree planting. If they associate it with fun, then the environmental stewardship will perpetuate a lot better. If it’s organized right and goes smoothly then it’s a feel-good thing, just like in the classroom,“ Smucker explained.

Smucker encourages his students to work out solutions to engineering problems with the tree plantings and challenges them to think up innovative ways to overcome obstacles. “Tree planting and technology education are really the same thing. It’s problem solving and the engineering design process. What is the problem? What is the solution? Evaluate and modify,” said Smucker.

Over the years, Smucker’s volunteer base and partner organizations have expanded to the point where he has been able to launch an organization of his own, Stream Link Education, a nonprofit that organizes and leads tree plantings with local community members, organizations and businesses. “The coolest thing I think we do is Natives for Nonprofits. We grow trees for giveaways to other organizations, which is great because budgets are really tight and donations are hugely welcome. It also helps establish partnerships, not because I want something in return but because it’s neat to make connections,” said Smucker.

Smucker aims to perpetuate choices and actions by providing people with hands on educational experiences. “If you’re excited about something and value it, then demonstrate the value, they [the volunteers] will see it. The excitement can be catching,” he said. He continued to explain that in addition to educating others and improving the environment, his enthusiasm for restoration remains strong because he is still able to grow as well, “I’m going to turn 50 in January and I’m thinking, ‘if I do this right, I’ve got my 50’s and 60’s and if I can stay healthy, I can do this for a long time.’ And that’s great. There is always something to learn.”

To view more photos, visit the Chesapeake Bay Program's Flickr page

Jenna Valente's avatar
About Jenna Valente - Jenna developed a passion for conservation through her outdoorsy nature and upbringing in Hawaii, Washington State and Maine. A graduate of Virginia Tech's Executive Master of Natural Resources program and University of Maine's School of Communication and Journalism, she welcomes any opportunity to educate the public about the importance of caring for the environment.



Jun
06
2012

Watershed Wednesday: Restore Mass Ave (Washington, D.C.)

The above 1913 photograph depicts rows of American lindens planted along Washington D.C.’s Massachusetts Avenue, west of Dupont Circle. The “double rows” of trees were planted in the 1880s, but many disappeared as the street was developed, new embassies were built, and utility lines installed. As a street that has historically been an international relations hub (it is home to major embassies), the loss of trees along Massachusetts Avenue seemed to represent the worldwide preference of commercialism over nature.

historic Mass Ave photo

(Image courtesy Restore Mass Ave/Washingtoniana MLK Library)

Today, the climate has shifted, and politicians jump at the chance to get their photo taken in front of a newly planted tree; but long before the diplomats grabbed their shovels (and press staff), Deborah Shapley was walking up and down Massachusetts Avenue, knocking on her neighbors’ doors, and asking them how far their hoses could stretch to water parched trees in the sidewalk.

Washington’s D.C.'s Department of Transportation's Urban Forestry Administration has taken the important step of planting trees along streets throughout the city, but it did not have the resources to water them. For young trees, lack of water lowers their chances of survival in Washington’s hot summers. Instead of complaining, Deborah encouraged her neighbors to take on the responsibility of watering their nearest city sidewalk tree as if it were their own.

“I started Restore Mass.Ave to be a model of how to get local property owners excited about taking care of the city trees near them.”

But convincing property owners to take care of a tree that isn’t technically in their yard is not so easy.

“People tend not to care about the landscape that is more than a house or two away,” explains Deborah. “So the cry for them to take care of trees beyond a certain distance, that’s just not practical to them.”

But since Deborah began Restore Mass Ave in 2007, more and more residents and embassies along the street have come to understand that these trees are dually beautifying their community and helping to absorb stormwater runoff.

Restore Mass Ave volunteers

(Image courtesy Restore Mass Ave)

In addition to caring for the 100 sidewalk trees installed by the city, Restore Mass has worked with Casey Trees to plant 125 new trees since 2007. Most of the 225 total trees are large shade trees, which absorb stormwater and lessen pressure on the neighborhood's combined sewer system.

Like most of downtown Washington D.C., Massachusetts Avenue has a combined sewer system (css), which collects water from both stormwater runoff and household’s sanitary sewage. The CSS conveys this to treatment plants to be cleaned before it flows into the Chesapeake Bay.

But during heavy rain events, the combined sewer system often overflows; the stormwater and sanitary wastes flow directly into the Anacostia or Potomac River. This can cause an excess of bacteria and other pollutants in Washington D.C.’s tributaries, rivers and the Chesapeake Bay.

While it is always important to find ways to decrease the amount of stormwater runoff flowing into storm drains, it is particularly crucial in neighborhoods with combined sewer overflows (roughly one-third of the District of Columbia).

“The city is under requirements from the EPA to rebuild the underground tunnels and pipes” associated with the combined overflow system, explains Deborah. “They’re only able to do a certain amount per year of underground infrastructure. But large trees naturally conduct precipitation down into the soil and lowers the burden the underground pipes.”’

Stormwater will instead be absorbed by trees, and help to recharge the groundwater so more plants can grow.

“If you have a continuous line of shade trees alongside of a gutter, less water flows into that storm drain, and less water is barreling around in the tunnels of the combined stormwater system,” Deborah says.

While trees help to absorb stormwater during rain events, they do need to be watered when it is not raining. Droughts and heat waves make it difficult for young trees to survive on their own. Luckily, Restore Mass Ave’s volunteers, known as “Treekeepers,” make sure care is given to every sidewalk tree.

Since roughly one-third of Mass Ave properties are foreign-owned, the organization works with embassies to plant trees on their grounds.

While it was once typical for embassies’ groundskeepers to maintain flowers the colors of the nations’ flags, it is now popular for embassies to also maintain the surrounding trees. Governments relate the activity to their climate change agendas. Groundskeepers become, in effect, "Treekeepers."

“They have a sense of ownership that they didn’t have before,” says Deborah. “When you give people who care for plants the chance to grow nearby sidewalk trees, they are delighted.”

As Restore Mass Ave encourages private homeowners and embassy staffs to care for trees in public space, the sense of shared community and stewardship multiplies.

“As in many neighborhoods, we found that the embassies don’t often talk to each other, but when you point out the common trees, and you engage all the staff, it becomes their common garden,” explains Deborah.

While Restore Mass Ave may have found a way to create a sense of an international environmental stewardship, Deborah, founder and president of the all-volunteer organization, concedes that the nonprofit would like to expand its influence, but not its area.

“The idea is to not take over a bigger and bigger area, but to get other people to start their own groups, such as Restore Georgia Avenue or Restore Connecticut Avenue. Only as more people here understand the importance and fun of growing trees, will DC become the ‘City of Trees’ as it was known a century ago."

Restore Mass Ave volunteers

(Image courtesy Restore Mass Ave)

Get involved

For more information on how you can get involved with Restore Mass Ave or start your own “Restore” on your street, visit the Restore Mass Ave Volunteer page.

Restore Mass Ave is trying to spread the word, via their Tree Care Blog (http://blog.restoremassave.org) and their Facebook and Twitter (#restoremassave).

Caitlin Finnerty's avatar
About Caitlin Finnerty - Caitlin Finnerty is the Communications Staffer at the Chesapeake Research Consortium and Chesapeake Bay Program. Caitlin grew up digging for dinosaur bones and making mud pies in Harrisburg, Pa. Her fine arts degree landed her environmental field work jobs everywhere from Oregon to Maryland. Now settled in Baltimore, she is eagerly expecting her first child while creating an urban garden oasis on her cement patio.



Oct
27
2008

Ferrying plants for a cleaner Potomac River

Last week, I volunteered with the National Aquarium in Baltimore for a day of shoreline buffer planting at the Naval Support Facility at Indian Head, located along the banks of the Potomac River in Maryland. Over the course of five days, Aquarium staff, the Maryland Conservation Corps, Charles County Master Gardeners and local residents planted over 5,000 native grass plants and 1,500 native trees along 4,830 feet of Potomac shoreline.

I’m pretty sure the trees I planted that day are among the most protected in the state of Maryland. After successfully passing through several security checks to enter the Naval facility, I met up with Aquarium staff at the marina.  We then piled into vans and passed through yet another security checkpoint before entering what I was told was a highly restricted area of the base (think ‘explosive deliveries’ signs and mysterious steam hanging in the air). We soon arrived at the drop-off and scampered down a steep hill to our planting site along the Potomac River.

When I arrived at the site, I was given the job of ferrying plants from the center of the site to their new and permanent home along the shoreline. There were low, medium and high marsh plant species that had to be placed accordingly. After ferrying the plants to their new home, the planting brigade -- mostly Maryland Conservation Corps folks -- dug holes and planted the trees.

After a short lunch break, I informed those in charge that I wanted to participate in the planting so I could have a more well-rounded day of volunteering (and because ferrying the plants was a lot of walking!). Soon after I began planting, I truly realized how difficult it is to successfully plant a tree. For some holes I had to use a pick ax to get through the tough soil! After about three hours of planting, we had completed our section for the day and all the trees were securely in the ground. 

I climbed back up to the top of the hill where I had been dropped off in the morning and looked down upon the section we had planted. It was amazing to see the sea of plants below me and the hard work of everyone volunteering that day. I’m curious to see what the site will look like in five, 10 and 20 years when the plants have established. 

I especially enjoy these days of my job when I’m able to leave the office and experience watershed restoration first-hand.  I walked away from that day with muddy boots, sore arms and a greater appreciation for ferrying plants.

About Krissy Hopkins - Krissy Hopkins was the Communications and Education Subcommittee staffer with the Chesapeake Research Consortium at the Chesapeake Bay Program.



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