Text Size: A  A  A

Bay Blog: students

Jul
21
2011

Teaching kids about pollution through the ReSET program

As I strode to the front of Ms. Molly Moran's second grade class at Annapolis Elementary School one June morning, I was confident in my lesson plan, so elegantly simple that I didn't even need the 3X5 index card in my shirt pocket on which I had it drawn out.

My former boss at EPA's Wetlands Division, John Meagher, had invited me to talk about what I do in my work through the ReSET program he directs. ReSET is a D.C.-based non-profit volunteer organization that partners working and retired scientists, engineers and technicians with elementary school teachers to improve science motivation and literacy. ReSET's goal is to introduce children in the classroom to science, engineering and technology as being enjoyable and exciting (i.e., fun!).

John did his lesson first.  I had scoped out his topic and identified a meaningful connection between his talk and mine.  He was going to teach a hands-on, desk-top laboratory lesson about buoyancy, including a key vocabulary word: "gravity."  (Did you know that a lacrosse ball sinks in fresh water but floats in salt water?)

I decided that was my link.  The audience would be primed.  I had decided on the audience participation approach, to put the pen into their little hands.

It was my turn. On the flip chart at the front of the class, I drew a hillside – a single black line – with wavy blue water at the bottom of the hill: the Bay, just like right outside the classroom window.  A stick-figure person.  A lolli-pop green tree.  A cloud.  A fish in the water.  A swimmer.  Rain.

I asked the class: "Where does the water go when it rains?"

The class: "Down to the Bay!"

"Why?"

One smart kid got it right: "Gravity!"

"How many of you have or know people who have dogs?"  All the hands went up.  Another volunteer drew a red dog on the hillside.

Then the clincher: "What do dogs do when you take them out to walk in the morning?"

The entire chorus:  "THEY POOP!"

Ms. Moran interrupted: "Oh, Mr. Mike, you just got them to say their favorite word!"  The audience, giggling, was wrapped.  "Wait!" I said, fumbling around the front desk, "There's no brown marker!"  Ms. Moran stopped the lesson until she could find one.

There was no shortage of volunteers to draw the little brown pile behind the dog.  It was not exactly to scale.

"Where does that poop go when it rains?"  "To the Bay"  "Why?"  "Gravity!"

"How do you think the fish and the swimmer feel about that?" "Yech!"

"What do you think you can do about that?" They knew that answer too.

And the lesson was over.  I haven't had that much fun since the last time I caught a steelhead on a fly rod in a snowstorm.

Seriously, if you like kids half as much as I do and care about the future of the world, combine the two by volunteering with John for the ReSET program.  John has the lesson plans; you and the kids have the fun.

About Mike Fritz - Mike Fritz is with the U.S. EPA at the Chesapeake Bay Program office.



Aug
20
2010

Question of the Week: Where can I find teaching resources about the Chesapeake Bay?

Welcome to the latest installment of the BayBlog Question of the Week! Each week, we take a question submitted on the Chesapeake Bay Program website or a frequently asked question and answer it here for all to read.

This week’s question comes from Christina in Havre de Grace, Md., a high school mathematics teacher looking for ways to work the Bay into her lesson plans. “Since the Bay is in our backyard, I would like my students to analyze some of the statistics from the Bay. Where can I find teaching resources related to the Chesapeake Bay?”

With school about to start back up, tying the Chesapeake Bay into your lesson plans is a great way to ease students back into the swing of things. It’s likely that many of them spent some time on and around the Bay during the summer, so they will have some personal connection to the topics of your lesson plan.

Fortunately, there is a great resource right on the web for all your Bay education needs, Bay Backpack. Clicking on Teaching Resources at the top of the page will bring you to a handy search tool that will help you narrow down the hundreds of lesson plans and curriculums available on the site. You can refine your search by subject area, education level, type, alignment and keywords.

In Christina’s case, we could select “mathematics,” “high school” and “data,” which will bring up about 10 resources to use to create lesson plans. Data sets will become available for her students to analyze in their statistics class, and the data will actually have meaning to these students who live right on the Bay, as opposed to using “canned” data with no personal meaning.

If just looking for data in general, the Chesapeake Bay Program website has a significant amount of data available for download. However, it is probably easier to find data that is easily adapted to lesson plans from the Bay Backpack site.

Lesson plans aren’t the only thing Bay Backpack can provide educators. Field studies, training opportunities and funding resources are all available on the site, free to be used by educators at all levels.

Bay Backpack is a great resource for teachers looking to incorporate the Chesapeake Bay into the classroom in new and innovative ways. We often underestimate the ways we can instill values of environmental stewardship into the classroom beyond science classes, but this website helps to break down those barriers. Working awareness of the Bay into day-to-day lessons across all subject areas helps to establish an environmentally conscious mindset among students from a young age, ensuring that they will become the stewards of the Bay and our environment in the future.

Be sure to follow Bay Backpack on Twitter, @BayBackpack and check out the Bay Backpack blog for more information about how to work the Bay into your classroom.

Do you have a question about the Chesapeake Bay? Ask us and we might choose your question for the next Question of the Week! 



410 Severn Avenue / Suite 112
Annapolis, Maryland 21403
Tel: (800) YOUR-BAY / Fax: (410) 267-5777
Directions to the Bay Program Office
Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
©2012 Chesapeake Bay Program | All Rights Reserved