How does too much sediment affect the Bay, its tributaries and the underwater plants and animals that live there?

Scientist Allen Gellis with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) visits Linganore Creek in Maryland to describe how he conducts studies of sediment sources in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Sediment forms when rocks and soil weather and erode. There are two major sources of sediment: eroding land and stream banks—called watershed sources of sediment—and eroding shorelines and coasts—called tidal sources of sediment. An estimated 2.7 million tons of sediment was delivered to the Chesapeake Bay in 2013 and an average of 5.2 million tons comes in each year. Too much sediment can cloud the waters of the Bay and its tributaries, harming underwater grasses, fish and shellfish.

Video Credits

Produced by
Will Parson
Music:
"A Moment of Jazz" by Ancelin

Tags:

Comments

Leave a comment:

Thank you!

Your comment has been received. Before it can be published, the comment will be reviewed by our team to ensure it adheres with our rules of engagement.

Back to all videos