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Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) Sediment Planning Targets

The 2010 Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (Bay TMDL) is in place to ensure the Bay and its tidal rivers maintain a healthy water quality by setting limits on the amount of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus pollution) and sediment that flow into it. Each of the six watershed states – Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia – and the District of Columbia recently developed roadmaps called Phase III Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) to guide them in meeting their pollutant reduction goals by 2025. Sediment allocations under the Bay TMDL were established differently than those for nutrient pollutants due to scientific evidence supporting the greater importance of reducing nitrogen and phosphorus loads entering the Bay.

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Phase III WIPs Fact Sheet

Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) are developed by the seven Chesapeake Bay watershed jurisdictions to help guide their actions as they work to meet the pollution reduction goals outlined in the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (Bay TMDL) by 2025. These plans consider such things as ecological restoration and sustainability while allowing for greater transparency and accountability for improved performance. Each Bay jurisdiction is currently developing its third WIP (Phase III) since the Bay TMDL was established in 2010. Phase III WIPs are expected to include the specific steps that each of the seven jurisdictions intends to implement between 2019 and 2025 to meet Bay restoration goals.

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Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP) Planning Targets Fact Sheet

The 2010 Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (Bay TMDL) outlines the reductions in nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment that are needed to ensure the Bay can meet water quality standards. To collectively achieve these Bay-wide nutrient and sediment reductions, each watershed jurisdiction is assigned specific targets. The Chesapeake Bay Program has developed updated planning targets for the Phase III Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs).

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Best Management Practices Fact Sheet

The implementation, tracking and reporting of best management practices (BMPs) has been at the center of the Chesapeake Bay Program’s restoration efforts for three decades. BMPs are conservation and technological practices that can reduce the amounts of nonpoint source pollutants—such as nutrients and sediment—that enter local waters and the tidal Chesapeake Bay. The Chesapeake Bay Program rigorously tracks the progress of its partners toward meeting goals for healthier Bay waters, including their BMP implementation efforts. As part of this effort, the partnership requires a three-step BMP verification process that ensures they are being implemented correctly and are effectively reducing nutrient and sediment pollution as expected.

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Accounting for Growth Fact Sheet

The population of the Chesapeake Bay region continues to grow, driving land use changes such as increases in developed land areas and decreases in agricultural and natural land cover. How will these changes affect future pollutant loads in the watershed? Using modeling tools, the Chesapeake Bay Program has generated growth projections through the year 2025, which will help jurisdictions (Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia) and local partners plan for what is to come. In this context, accounting for growth really means accounting for changes in pollution loads from any source category (e.g. wastewater) due to population growth and associated land use change.

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2017-2018 Bay Barometer Fact Sheet: West Virginia

More than 3,500 square miles of West Virginia sit within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and one of the state’s major rivers—the Potomac—flows into the Bay. West Virginia has committed to achieving 18 of the outcomes in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. Its progress toward seven of these outcomes is highlighted here.

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2017-2018 Bay Barometer Fact Sheet: Washington, D.C.

All of Washington, D.C., sits within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which means all the District’s rivers—including the Anacostia and the Potomac—flow into the Bay. The District has committed to achieving 22 of the outcomes in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. Its progress toward seven of these outcomes is highlighted here.

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2017-2018 Bay Barometer Fact Sheet: Delaware

More than 700 square miles of Delaware sit within the 64,000 square mile Chesapeake Bay watershed, and four of the state’s major rivers—the Choptank, Nanticoke, Pocomoke and Sassafras—flow into the Bay. Delaware has committed to achieving 22 of the outcomes in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. Its progress toward seven of these outcomes is highlighted here.

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2017-2018 Bay Barometer Fact Sheet: Maryland

Almost all of Maryland sits within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, and four of the state’s major rivers—including the Choptank, Patuxent, Potomac and Susquehanna—flow into the Bay. Maryland has committed to achieving 29 of the outcomes in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Agreement. Its progress toward 10 of these outcomes is highlighted here.

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