Shoofly pie is a Pennsylvania Dutch dessert tradition. (Image by Christopher Paquette/Flickr)

Spanning 64,000 miles and six states, the Chesapeake Bay region encompasses a diverse array of backgrounds, cultures and local flavors. As you plan your holiday feast this year, celebrate the Chesapeake with recipes that represent the traditions of each state.

Delaware: Dilly crab dip

(Photo courtesy jeffreyw/Flickr)

For an easy to make, crowd-pleasing snack to munch on while the turkey cooks, try out a Delaware favorite – dilly crab dip. While there are hot, baked varieties of the dip, this version is served cold and combines flaked crabmeat with mayonnaise, sour cream and plenty of dried dill. Try out this recipe from Better Homes and Gardens as a simple appetizer before your main course.

Oyster stuffing (Maryland)

Whether you call it “stuffing” or “dressing,” no Thanksgiving menu would be complete without this traditional side. With the addition of Maryland oysters, the classic dish becomes a celebration of local seafood. Including oysters and their liquid in the mix of chopped vegetables and crusty bread gives the stuffing a rich, salty flavor. Ree Drummond from The Pioneer Woman Cooks shares her recipe for cornbread oyster dressing.

Apple pie (New York)

(Photo courtesy Edward Kimber/Flickr)

While pumpkin and pecan pies may be the top desserts that come to mind at Thanksgiving, apple pies are plentiful on holiday dinner tables across the country. As one of the top apple producing states in the U.S., New York has plenty of the crisp, tart apples needed to make the perfect pie. Check out this recipe from Serious Eats to learn about the science behind a foolproof apple pie.

Shoofly pie (Pennsylvania)

No one is quite sure where the name of this Pennsylvania Dutch dessert originated. One generally accepted explanation is that, as the pies cooled, bakers would have to “shoo” away numerous flies drawn to the sticky-sweet molasses filling. Regardless of its name, the dessert makes an appearance on many Pennsylvania tables during the holidays. As the pie bakes, the brown sugar crumb topping sinks into the molasses custard base and creates a cake-like middle layer. Bon Appetit magazine published this recipe used by Wendy Jo’s Homemade in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

Ham (Virginia)

(Photo courtesy J. Hendron/Flickr)

Turkey may be the main course at most Thanksgiving dinners, but in Virginia, the bird often shares the spotlight – or it may be missing from the table completely. Instead, a Virginia ham is served, glazed with honey, brown sugar, or even Coca-Cola. Check out this post at The Kitchn for tips on buying, glazing, and baking a holiday ham.

Squash casserole (West Virginia)

This creamy, cheesy dish appears at Sunday dinners and holiday celebrations across the southern United States and is a favorite in the Mountain State. A simple base of squash, onion, and cheese is topped with a crunchy layer of breadcrumbs and baked until bubbly. Sommer Collier from A Spicy Perspective shares her recipe for a cornbread-topped version of the classic side.

Have your own favorite Chesapeake recipe? Let us know in the comments!

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Barbara Iavasile

I was born in western Maryland an turkey stuffing would never be made without oysters....

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