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Long-Term Trends for Bottom Total Phosphorus in the Chesapeake Bay: 1999-2013

Long-term trends were computed by state partners using the Seasonal Kendall non-parametric technique for annual data collected from 1999-2013. Highly significant trends are indicated with triangles and possible trends are show with colored circles. Bottom total phosphorus concentrations are decreasing/improving significantly at 27 stations, possibly decreasing at 13 stations, increasing/degrading significantly at 12 stations, and possibly increasing at 10 stations.

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2014 Public Access

Existing public access sites in the Chesapeake Bay watershed as reported by state partners through 2014. Sites added in 2014 are depicted in orange, while sites existing before 2014 are blue.

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Long-Term Trends for Bottom Total Nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay: 1999-2013

Long-term trends were computed by state partners using the Seasonal Kendall non-parametric technique for annual data collected from 1999-2013. Highly significant trends are indicated with triangles and possible trends are show with colored circles. Bottom total nitrogen concentrations are decreasing/improving significantly at 31 stations, possibly decreasing at 15 stations, and increasing/degrading significantly at 1 station.

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Long-Term Trends for Surface Total Phosphorus in the Chesapeake Bay: 1999-2013

Long-term trends were computed by state partners using the Seasonal Kendall non-parametric technique for annual data collected from 1999-2013. Highly significant trends are indicated with triangles and possible trends are show with colored circles. Surface total phosphorus concentrations are decreasing/improving significantly at 36 stations, possibly decreasing at 23 stations, increasing/degrading significantly at 2 stations, and possibly increasing at 6 stations.

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Long-Term Trends for Surface Orthophosphate in the Chesapeake Bay: 1999-2013

Long-term trends were computed by state partners using the Seasonal Kendall non-parametric technique for annual data collected from 1999-2013. Highly significant trends are indicated with triangles and possible trends are show with colored circles. Surface Orthophosphate concentrations are decreasing/improving significantly at 29 stations, possibly decreasing at 7 stations, increasing/degrading significantly at 5 stations, and possibly increasing at 2 stations.

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Long-Term Trends for Surface Total Nitrogen in the Chesapeake Bay: 1999-2013

Long-term trends were computed by state partners using the Seasonal Kendall non-parametric technique for annual data collected from 1999-2013. Highly significant trends are indicated with triangles and possible trends are show with colored circles. Surface total nitrogen concentrations are decreasing/improving significantly at 41 stations, possibly decreasing at 16 stations, increasing/degrading significantly at 1 station, and possibly increasing at 1 station.

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Long-Term Trends for Surface Chlorophyll-a in the Chesapeake Bay: 1999-2013

Long-term trends were computed by state partners using the Seasonal Kendall non-parametric technique for annual data collected from 1999-2013. Highly significant trends are indicated with triangles and possible trends are show with colored circles. Surface chlorophyll-a concentrations are decreasing/improving significantly at 2 stations, possibly decreasing at 7 stations, increasing/degrading significantly at 25 stations, and possibly increasing at 16 stations.

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Population (2014)

This map shows population estimates within the Chesapeake Bay watershed on a county-by-county basis for the year 2014. For counties not completely within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, the population numbers were derived as a proportion of the total county based on land area.

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Shad Abundance (2014)

American shad were once the most abundant and economically important species in the Chesapeake Bay. Shad are anadromous fish and spend most of their lives in the ocean, returning to freshwater rivers to spawn after they reach maturity. Data for the York, Potomac, Rappahannock and lower James Rivers were provided by the Virginia Institute of Marine Science via an ongoing Catch per Unit Effort (CPUE) study involving American Shad gill-netting. Data for the Susquehanna and upper James Rivers represent published fishway passage values for Conowingo and Boshers Dams, respectively.

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