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Chesapeake Bay News

Jul
26
2011

10 interesting facts about Chesapeake Bay critters

The Chesapeake Bay region is home to an amazing diversity of animals. From birds to fish to mammals, all of these creatures are an important, meaningful part of the Bay’s delicate ecosystem.

You probably know something about the Bay’s most popular critters, like blue crabs, ospreys and blue herons. But there are thousands of other important, unique critters that live in the region.

Here are some interesting facts about 10 of the Chesapeake Bay region’s critters.

  1. Red Fox

Found near swamps, forests and farms throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed, these reddish, dog-like mammals can run up to 30 miles per hour and jump 6 feet in the air!

  1. Boring Sponge

Admittedly, aquatic sponges may not seem very exciting, but that’s not why this critter is called “boring.” The boring sponge gets its name from its habit of boring holes into oyster shells, which weakens or damages the shells. If you’ve ever found an oyster shell covered with pock marks, that oyster was once infested by a boring sponge.

  1. Sea Turtles

Female sea turtles each lay about 100 eggs on beaches from Virginia to the Caribbean during spring and summer. Once the eggs hatch, the young sea turtles have less than a 1 percent chance of surviving to adulthood. But if they make it, they could live to be more than 50 years old!

  1. Horseshoe Crabs

Contrary to popular belief, horseshoe crabs are not actually crabs. These hard-shelled arthropods are more closely related to terrestrial spiders and scorpions. Their external appearance has not changed in more than 350 million years, either. Talk about prehistoric!

  1. Double-crested Cormorant

These large, black birds can see both above and under the water. They fly low over the water and dive under to catch their pray.

  1. Atlantic Sturgeon

Sturgeons are prehistoric fish that has been around since dinosaurs roamed the Earth! They can also live to be 60 years old.

  1. Willet

This black and white bird nests in depressions in marshes. After the chicks hatch, the female leaves the nest. The male will continue tending them for another two weeks.

  1. Summer Flounder

When they are born, summer flounders have one eye on each side of their head. However, as they grow older, the right eye gradually moves over the head to join the left eye on the other side of the body!

  1. Bobcat

The only time male and female bobcats interact is when they are mating. After they are finished, they go their separate ways.

  1. Wood Duck

This beautiful bird’s scientific name, Aix sponsa, means “waterfowl in a bridal dress.”

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About Kristen Foringer - Need some text


Keywords: fish, birds, animals

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